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I have a simple example script constructed that defines three separate processes using multiprocessing in python. My objective is to have one parent thread that spawns two smaller threads that will collect and process data.

Currently, my implementation looks like this:

from Queue import Queue,Empty
from multiprocessing import Process
import time
import hashlib


class FillQueue(Process):
    def __init__(self,q):
        Process.__init__(self)
        self.q = q

    def run(self):
        i = 0
        while i is not 5:
            print 'putting'
            self.q.put('foo')
            i+=1
        self.q.put('|STOP|')

class ConsumeQueue(Process):
    def __init__(self,q):
        Process.__init__(self)
        self.q = q

    def run(self):
        print 'Consume'
        while True:
            try:
                value =  self.q.get(False)
                print value
                if value == '|STOP|':
                    print 'done'
                    break;
            except Empty:
                print 'Nothing to process atm'

class Ripper(Process):

    q = Queue()

    def __init__(self):
        self.fq = FillQueue(self.q)
        self.cq = ConsumeQueue(self.q)
        self.fq.daemon = True
        self.cq.daemon = True

    def run(self):
        try:
            self.fq.start()
            self.cq.start()
        except KeyboardInterrupt:
            print 'exit'

if __name__ == '__main__':
    r = Ripper()
    r.start()

As it runs presently, the output from the script on CLI looks like this:

putting
putting
putting
putting
putting
Consume
foo
foo
foo
foo
foo
|STOP|
done

Obviously, the way I am starting my two threads is blocking, since the consumer doesn't even begin to process the items in the queue until the filler finishes adding items.

How should I rewrite this to make both threads begin immediately and not block, so the consumer will simply pass to the Empty except block while there is no work to process, but will exit completely when it receives the stop message?

EDIT: typo, had the start and run methods mixed up

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

try this:

from Queue import Empty
from multiprocessing import Process, Queue
import time
import hashlib


class FillQueue(object):
    def __init__(self, q): 
        self.q = q 

    def run(self):
        i = 0 
        while i < 5:
            print 'putting'
            self.q.put('foo %d' % i ) 
            i+=1
            time.sleep(.5)
        self.q.put('|STOP|')

class ConsumeQueue(object):
    def __init__(self, q): 
        self.q = q 

    def run(self):
        while True:
            try:
                value =  self.q.get(False)
                print value
                if value == '|STOP|':
                    print 'done'
                    break;
            except Empty:
                print 'Nothing to process atm'
                time.sleep(.2)


if __name__ == '__main__':
    q = Queue()
    f = FillQueue(q)
    c = ConsumeQueue(q)

    p1 = Process(target=f.run)
    p1.start()

    p2 = Process(target=c.run)
    p2.start()

    p1.join()
    p2.join()
share|improve this answer
    
This worked, though I changed the objects back to inherit from Process and used the run method directly instead. Thanks! –  DeaconDesperado Oct 2 '12 at 20:13
    
It is probably now to late to help OP but I just wanted to add that it helped me to add sys.stdout.flush() after each print. When I tried your example it printed only at the end. –  AxP Feb 4 at 20:46

I think your program works fine. The CPU processes only one thing at a time, for a short time. However, the time required to put all your stuff in the queue is very short. So there is no reason that the filler cannot do this in one time slice.

If you add some delays in the filler, I think you should see that it actually works as you expect.

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You seem to be starting multiple processes using multiprocessing.Process.

However, you are using Queue.Queue which is only threadsafe, and not designed to be used by multiple processes.

shevek's answer is valid as well, but as a start, you should replace Queue.Queue with multiprocessing.Queue.

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