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How can I test that my controller action is putting the correct errors in the ModelState when validating an entity, when I'm using DataAnnotation validation in MVC 2 Preview 1?

Some code to illustrate. First, the action:

    [HttpPost]
    public ActionResult Index(BlogPost b)
    {
        if(ModelState.IsValid)
        {
            _blogService.Insert(b);
            return(View("Success", b));
        }
        return View(b);
    }

And here's a failing unit test that I think should be passing but isn't (using MbUnit & Moq):

[Test]
public void When_processing_invalid_post_HomeControllerModelState_should_have_at_least_one_error()
{
    // arrange
    var mockRepository = new Mock<IBlogPostSVC>();
    var homeController = new HomeController(mockRepository.Object);

    // act
    var p = new BlogPost { Title = "test" };            // date and content should be required
    homeController.Index(p);

    // assert
    Assert.IsTrue(!homeController.ModelState.IsValid);
}

I guess in addition to this question, should I be testing validation, and should I be testing it in this way?

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4  
Isn't var p = new BlogPost { Title = "test" }; more Arrange than Act? –  RichardOD Aug 13 '09 at 7:40
    
shrug how so? –  mgroves Aug 13 '09 at 18:52
    
Assert.IsFalse(homeController.ModelState.IsValid); –  seth flowers Mar 27 at 19:59
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9 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Instead of passing in a BlogPost you can also declare the actions parameter as FormCollection. Then you can create the BlogPost yourself and call UpdateModel(model, formCollection.ToValueProvider());. This will trigger the validation for any field in the FormCollection.

    [HttpPost]
    public ActionResult Index(FormCollection form)
    {
        var b = new BlogPost();
        TryUpdateModel(model, form.ToValueProvider());

        if (ModelState.IsValid)
        {
            _blogService.Insert(b);
            return (View("Success", b));
        }
        return View(b);
    }

Just make sure your test adds a null value for every field in the views form that you want to leave empty.

I found that doing it this way, at the expense of a few extra lines of code, makes my unit tests resemble the way the code gets called at runtime more closely making them more valuable. Also you can test what happens when someone enters "abc" in a control bound to an int property.

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2  
I like this approach, but it seems like a step backwards, or at least one extra step that I have to put in each action that handles POST. –  mgroves Aug 13 '09 at 12:34
2  
I agree. But having my unit tests and the real app work the same way is worth the effort. –  Maurice Aug 13 '09 at 12:46
5  
ARMs approach is better IMHO :) –  subkamran Feb 12 '11 at 1:39
2  
This kind of defeats the purpose of MVC. –  Andy Apr 12 '12 at 16:06
2  
I agree that ARM's answer is better. Passing in a FormCollection to a controller action is undesirable, in comparison to passing a strongly typed Model/ViewModel object. –  Alex York May 26 '12 at 16:14
show 1 more comment

Hate to necro a old post, but I thought I'd add my own thoughts (since I just had this problem and ran across this post while seeking the answer).

  1. Don't test validation in your controller tests. Either you trust MVC's validation or write your own (i.e. don't test other's code, test your code)
  2. If you do want to test validation is doing what you expect, test it in your model tests (I do this for a couple of my more complex regex validations).

What you really want to test here is that your controller does what you expect it to do when validation fails. That's your code, and your expectations. Testing it is easy once you realize that's all you want to test:

[test]
public void TestInvalidPostBehavior()
{
    // arrange
    var mockRepository = new Mock<IBlogPostSVC>();
    var homeController = new HomeController(mockRepository.Object);
    var p = new BlogPost();

    homeController.ViewData.ModelState.AddModelError("Key", "ErrorMessage"); // Values of these two strings don't matter.  
    // What I'm doing is setting up the situation: my controller is receiving an invalid model.

    // act
    var result = (ViewResult) homeController.Index(p);

    // assert
    result.ForView("Index")
    Assert.That(result.ViewData.Model, Is.EqualTo(p));
}
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2  
I think this is actually the cleanest and most correct way of doing what's asked for in the original question. Good one! –  Øyvind Nov 19 '10 at 16:09
    
Excellent points! I agree. –  GiddyUpHorsey Feb 14 '11 at 12:34
    
Your answer (especially point #1) just gave me the same warm fuzzy feeling I get when I delete unnecessary code. I'd been struggling with this for the last half hour. Thanks for the clarity man. –  Ken Pespisa Apr 22 '11 at 20:38
3  
This should be marked as the correct answer –  Rob Richardson Sep 17 '11 at 0:21
    
Thanks for sharing this! I agree its the closet to the actual answer! –  Rippo Apr 10 '12 at 14:11
show 6 more comments

I had been having the same problem, and after reading Pauls answer and comment, I looked for a way of manually validating the view model.

I found this tutorial which explains how to manually validate a ViewModel that uses DataAnnotations. They Key code snippet is towards the end of the post.

I amended the code slightly - in the tutorial the 4th parameter of the TryValidateObject is omitted (validateAllProperties). In order to get all the annotations to Validate, this should be set to true.

Additionaly I refactored the code into a generic method, to make testing of ViewModel validation simple:

private static void ValidateViewModel<VM, C>(VM viewModelToValidate, C controller) where C:Controller
{
    var validationContext = new ValidationContext(viewModelToValidate, null, null);
    var validationResults = new List<ValidationResult>();
    Validator.TryValidateObject(viewModelToValidate, validationContext, validationResults, true);
    foreach (var validationResult in validationResults)
    {
        controller.ModelState.AddModelError(validationResult.MemberNames.First(), validationResult.ErrorMessage);
    }
}

So far this has worked really well for us.

share|improve this answer
    
Very cool, I can definitely use this :) –  mgroves Jul 28 '10 at 13:35
    
Nice, but only works in .NET 4 apparently, not 3.5 –  codeulike Sep 23 '10 at 19:23
    
Sorry hadn't even checked that. All our MVC projects are in 4.0 –  Giles Smith Sep 24 '10 at 22:02
1  
This is exactly what I was looking for. I wish I could upvote it twice. –  Evan M Apr 7 '11 at 16:16
4  
Why does that need to be using Generics? This could be consumed much easier if it were defined as : void ValidateViewModel(object viewModelToValidate, Controller controller) or even better as an extension method: public static void ValidateViewModel(this Controller controller, object viewModelToValidate) –  Chad Grant Mar 16 '12 at 20:24
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When you call the homeController.Index method in your test, you aren't using any of the MVC framework that fires off the validation so ModelState.IsValid will always be true. In our code we call a helper Validate method directly in the controller rather than using ambient validation. I haven't had much experience with the DataAnnotations (We use NHibernate.Validators) maybe someone else can offer guidance how to call Validate from within your controller.

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I like the term "ambient validation". But there must be a way to trigger this in a unit test though? –  mgroves Aug 13 '09 at 12:35
3  
The issue though is that you're basically testing the MVC framework - not your controller. You're trying to confirm that MVC is validating your model as you expect. The only way to do that with any certainty would be to mock the entire MVC pipeline and simulate a web request. That's probably more than you really need to know. If you're just testing that the data validation on your models is setup correctly you can do that without the controller and just run the data validation manually. –  Paul Alexander Aug 13 '09 at 20:11
    
Both answers so far have been great, I wish I could give you both a checkmark. –  mgroves Aug 16 '09 at 1:05
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I'm using ModelBinders in my test cases to be able to update model.IsValid value.

var form = new FormCollection();
form.Add("Name", "0123456789012345678901234567890123456789");

var model = MvcModelBinder.BindModel<AddItemModel>(controller, form);

ViewResult result = (ViewResult)controller.Add(model);

With my MvcModelBinder.BindModel method as follows (basically the same code used internally in the MVC framework):

        public static TModel BindModel<TModel>(Controller controller, IValueProvider valueProvider) where TModel : class
        {
            IModelBinder binder = ModelBinders.Binders.GetBinder(typeof(TModel));
            ModelBindingContext bindingContext = new ModelBindingContext()
            {
                FallbackToEmptyPrefix = true,
                ModelMetadata = ModelMetadataProviders.Current.GetMetadataForType(null, typeof(TModel)),
                ModelName = "NotUsedButNotNull",
                ModelState = controller.ModelState,
                PropertyFilter = (name => { return true; }),
                ValueProvider = valueProvider
            };

            return (TModel)binder.BindModel(controller.ControllerContext, bindingContext);
        }
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This does not work if you have got more than one validation attribute on one property. Add this line controller.ModelState.Clear(); before the code that creates ModelBindingContext and it would work –  Suhas Apr 12 '12 at 16:36
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I was researching this today and I found this blog post by Roberto Hernández (MVP) that seems to provide the best solution to fire the validators for a controller action during unit testing. This will put the correct errors in the ModelState when validating an entity.

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This doesn't exactly answer your question, because it abandons DataAnnotations, but I'll add it because it might help other people write tests for their Controllers:

You have the option of not using the validation provided by System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations but still using the ViewData.ModelState object, by using its AddModelError method and some other validation mechanism. E.g:

public ActionResult Create(CompetitionEntry competitionEntry)
{        
    if (competitionEntry.Email == null)
        ViewData.ModelState.AddModelError("CompetitionEntry.Email", "Please enter your e-mail");

    if (ModelState.IsValid)
    {
       // insert code to save data here...
       // ...

       return Redirect("/");
    }
    else
    {
        // return with errors
        var viewModel = new CompetitionEntryViewModel();
        // insert code to populate viewmodel here ...
        // ...


        return View(viewModel);
    }
}

This still lets you take advantage of the Html.ValidationMessageFor() stuff that MVC generates, without using the DataAnnotations. You have to make sure the key you use with AddModelError matches what the view is expecting for validation messages.

The controller then becomes testable because the validation is happening explicitly, rather than being done automagically by the MVC framework.

share|improve this answer
    
Doing validation this way throws away some of the best parts of validation in MVC. I want to add validation on my model, not in the controller. If I use this solution I will end up with a lot of possible code duplicates with the accompanying nightmares. –  W.Meints Mar 5 '12 at 10:00
    
@W.Meints: right, but the lines of code in the above example that do the validation could also be moved to a method on the Model if you prefer. The point is, doing the validation via code rather than Attributes makes it more testable. Paul explains it better above stackoverflow.com/a/1269960/22194 –  codeulike Mar 5 '12 at 10:35
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I agree that ARM has the best answer: test the behaviour of your controller, not the built-in validation.

However, you can also unit test that your Model/ViewModel has the correct validation attributes defined. Let's say your ViewModel looks like this:

public class PersonViewModel
{
    [Required]
    public string FirstName { get; set; }
}

This unit test will test for the existence of the [Required] attribute:

[TestMethod]
public void FirstName_should_be_required()
{
    var propertyInfo = typeof(PersonViewModel).GetProperty("FirstName");

    var attribute = propertyInfo.GetCustomAttributes(typeof(RequiredAttribute), false)
                                .FirstOrDefault();

    Assert.IsNotNull(attribute);
}
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In contrast to ARM, I don't have a problem with grave digging. So here is my suggestion. It builds on the answer of Giles Smith and works for ASP.NET MVC4 (I know the question is about MVC 2, but Google doesn't discriminate when looking for answers and I cannot test on MVC2.) Instead of putting the validation code in a generic static method, I put it in a test controller. The controller has everything needed for validation. So, the test controller looks like this:

using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations;
using System.Linq;
using System.Wbe.Mvc;

protected class TestController : Controller
    {
        public void TestValidateModel(object Model)
        {
            ValidationContext validationContext = new ValidationContext(Model, null, null);
            List<ValidationResult> validationResults = new List<ValidationResult>();
            Validator.TryValidateObject(Model, validationContext, validationResults, true);
            foreach (ValidationResult validationResult in validationResults)
            {
                this.ModelState.AddModelError(String.Join(", ", validationResult.MemberNames), validationResult.ErrorMessage);
            }
        }
    }

Of course the class does not need to be a protected innerclass, that is the way I use it now but I probably am going to reuse that class. If somewhere there is a model MyModel that is decorated with nice data annotation attributes, then the test looks something like this:

    [TestMethod()]
    public void ValidationTest()
    {
        MyModel item = new MyModel();
        item.Description = "This is a unit test";
        item.LocationId = 1;

        TestController testController = new TestController();
        testController.TestValidateModel(item);

        Assert.IsTrue(testController.ModelState.IsValid, "A valid model is recognized.");
    }

The advantage of this setup is that I can reuse the test controller for tests of all my models and may be able to extend it to mock a bit more about the controller or use the protected methods that a controller has.

Hope it helps.

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