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I have a c file that starts with a struct I am calling stringtable, looks like this

struct stringtable {
   int table[];
   int numElements = 15;
};

And I have a header for it that has this typedef

typedef stringtable *stringtable_ref;

When I compile with gcc I get the errors: expected identifier or '(' before '[' token expected ':' before 'int'

like I have declared the struct wrong. I have done structs in C like this before so my question is: Am I making a mistake declaring my struct? Does it need to have a tag before the semicolon? Are there only certain places I am allowed to declare a struct?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted
struct stringtable {
   int table[];
   int numElements = 15;
};

A flexible array member like int table[]; can only be the last member of a struct (with at least one more member).

And you can't assign a default value to a member in a struct declaration, C doesn't support that.

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Why is that? It's kinda stupid –  Blood Oct 2 '12 at 20:21
1  
What is? That you can't give a default value? I don't know why it's not allowed, but I see no reason why it should be, and it would make struct_with_default_value *ptr = malloc(100 * sizeof *ptr); pretty awkward, one might expect the default values set there, but malloc certainly won't do it. –  Daniel Fischer Oct 2 '12 at 20:27

Unless you have a static member in your struct, you cannot initialize the members upon declaration.

You need to create an instance of your struct before initalizing the members:

 struct stringtable str_table;
 str_table.numElements = 15; 
 //etc
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I would also expect that you need in the header typedef struct stringtable *stringtable_ref

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