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I'm searching a js one-liner to delete everything inside the <html> Tag.

I want to remove the <head>, the <body> and everything else declared outside those.

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3  
Why? You would then not be able to do anything, as the JS will be gone too. –  Oded Oct 2 '12 at 20:07
    
Would that not put it in an infinite loop...? –  ChrisW Oct 2 '12 at 20:08
    
maybe try to use ajax to load some php script that will remove everyhting –  Derfder Oct 2 '12 at 20:09
    
Why not? ;) I want to make a Chrome Extension and all it does is to remove everything inside the Webpage. –  John Oct 2 '12 at 20:09
1  
-1 What have you tried? stackoverflow.com/questions/3955229/… –  msanford Oct 3 '12 at 3:25

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

document.write() will create empty page, or actually the following code:

<html>
  <head></head>
  <body></body>
</html>

But I am not sure if this won't clash if the code will be in external file

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1  
This works! Thank you very much! –  John Oct 2 '12 at 20:16
    
@John you should accept this as the correct answer then. –  Allan Kimmer Jensen Oct 3 '12 at 7:46

It's not an oneliner, but it does the job you're asking for.

document.open();
document.write("");
document.close();
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No need to open and close the document. Simply calling document.write(), as @Zefiryn mentioned, does the trick. Thanks for your answer –  John Oct 2 '12 at 20:23
    
@John It may appear to work, but I've had problems without using open and close...which is possible that you may not encounter. –  Ian Oct 2 '12 at 20:30
    
It'll maybe work "perfectly fine" in context of a Chrome Extension script (I can't tell about that from experience; for instance, perhaps Chrome has already implicitly done document.open() for you), but it'll not reliably work in context of a normal JS function/script, at least not if you want to keep it cross browser compatible. –  BalusC Oct 2 '12 at 20:30
    
Ah, many thanks for pointing this out @BalusC ! I'm only using this in context of a Chrome Extension. –  John Oct 2 '12 at 20:44

1 liner :)

window.onload = function(){ document.getElementsByTagName("html")[0].innerHTML = "";};
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Once your HTML page is loaded, the javascript is loaded into the browser memory. So if you are to load jQuery for instance, you can simply call;

$('html').empty();

Give it a try using Google Chrome's Javascript Console. Type the above code, then you can still access jQuery and manipulate the DOM.

Edit

To answer your comment John. You have not stated in your question that jQuery cannot be used.

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Hehe, thanks! But no jQuery allowed ;) –  John Oct 2 '12 at 20:33
1  
+1 Also, @John, almost everywhere on SO, where a library is disallowed, it's explicitly stated in the question. Simply saying "js" doesn't presume "vanilla EMCAScript". –  msanford Oct 3 '12 at 3:25
    
@msanford unfortunately some people do not know how to construct a good question and others Down vote without thinking. Thanks for +1! –  Tim B James Oct 3 '12 at 7:40

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