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I would like to create a function where I can pass in an arbitrary object and check to see if it has a specific property with a specific value. Im attempting to do this using reflection, but reflection still confuses me a little bit. I was hoping that someone might be able to point me in the right direction.

here is the code that im trying but obviously it doesnt work:

    public static bool PropertyHasValue(object obj, string propertyName, string propertyValue)
{
    try
    {
        if(obj.GetType().GetProperty(propertyName,BindingFlags.Instance).GetValue(obj, null).ToString() == propertyValue)
        {
            Debug.Log (obj.GetType().FullName + "Has the Value" + propertyValue);
            return true;    
        }

        Debug.Log ("No property with this value");
        return false;
    }
    catch
    {
        Debug.Log ("This object doesnt have this property");
        return false;
    }

}
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2  
What "doesn't work"? Are you getting errors? –  MyCodeSucks Oct 2 '12 at 20:12
1  
@MichaelTaylor3D Rather than just printing out that there was an error, you should actually catch the specific execption and log the details of the exception so you know what went wrong (or better yet, don't catch the exception at all if you can't properly handle it). –  Servy Oct 2 '12 at 20:15
1  
Just an FYI, if you're trying to find non-public properties on a secure runtime (say Silverlight) you won't get any. Even with reflection, the Silverlight runtime prevents you from grabbing non-public members. –  Chris Sinclair Oct 2 '12 at 20:17
1  
Or even better: Continue using GetProperty, but check if its output is null (the property was not found) or an PropertyInfo instance. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Oct 2 '12 at 20:27
1  
@MichaelTaylor3D catching exceptions is not a correct way to do flow control. It's incredibly slow. Refer to this: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/seyhszts(v=vs.100).aspx –  tomfanning Oct 3 '12 at 8:05

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You will want to specify more BindingFlags in the Type.GetProperty method call. You do this with a | character and the other flags, such as BindingFlags.Public. Other issues are not checking for null obj parameter or null result from your PropertyInfo.GetValue call.

To be more explicit in your method, you could write it like this and collapse down where you see fit.

public static bool PropertyHasValue(object obj, string propertyName, string propertyValue)
{
    try
    {
        if(obj != null)
        {
            PropertyInfo prop = obj.GetType().GetProperty(propertyName, BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.Public);
            if(prop != null)
            {
                object val = prop.GetValue(obj,null);
                string sVal = Convert.ToString(val);
                if(sVal == propertyValue)
                {
                    Debug.Log (obj.GetType().FullName + "Has the Value" + propertyValue);
                    return true;    
                }
            }
        }

        Debug.Log ("No property with this value");
        return false;
    }
    catch
    {
        Debug.Log ("An error occurred.");
        return false;
    }
}

In my opinion you should accept propertyValue as an object and compare the objects equally, but that would exhibit a different behavior than your original sample.

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When retrieving members, in addition to specifying instance/static you must specify Public/NonPublic:

For example, to retrieve public properties you would use:

GetProperty(propertyName,BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.Public)

To retrieve all properties you must retrive both Public and NonPublic.

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Reflection can still get the property if it's non-public. He might want to do this, but I don't see how this is the reason it isn't working. –  Servy Oct 2 '12 at 20:17
    
The binding flags limit the results, so drop them altogether and you will get the instance. –  Les Oct 2 '12 at 20:19
    
When you specify instance you must also specify either public or non public. That is just the way it works. See the sample here (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/kyaxdd3x.aspx) and document here (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/…). Thanks @FlyingStreudel, I was not able to find that. –  Damian Schenkelman Oct 2 '12 at 20:21

Its too late to answer this question here. But I was searching for the same problem and solved it in a cleaner way with LINQ and Reflection. So if you are open to LINQ. You can get it like this.

String propertyValue = "Value_to_be_compared";

Bool Flag = YourObject.GetType().GetProperties().Any(t => t.GetValue(objEmailGUID, null).ToString().Contains(propertyValue));

if(Flag)
{
  //spread love if true
}

Code will check if any of the property of you object Contains the Value_to_be_compared

If you want to match exact value then you can go for:

Bool Flag = YourObject.GetType().GetProperties().Any(t => t.GetValue(objEmailGUID, null).ToString() == propertyValue);
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You should take a look at msdn and read up about binding flags. In specific:

You must specify Instance or Static along with Public or NonPublic or no members will be returned.

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