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set_error_handler callback function accepts 2 mandatory arguments and 3 optional arguments. One of which is $errno (first one).

What is its use ? Is it integer representation of E_ALL or E_NOTICE .... ?

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I think that is correct looking at the manual. "The first parameter, errno, contains the level of the error raised, as an integer." –  ficuscr Oct 2 '12 at 20:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The $errno contains the level of the error raised, as an integer.

I think this example will make it clear (not my code):

 switch ($errno) {
    case E_USER_ERROR:
        echo "<b>My ERROR</b> [$errno] $errstr<br />\n";
        echo "  Fatal error on line $errline in file $errfile";
        echo ", PHP " . PHP_VERSION . " (" . PHP_OS . ")<br />\n";
        echo "Aborting...<br />\n";
        exit(1);
        break;

    case E_USER_WARNING:
        echo "<b>My WARNING</b> [$errno] $errstr<br />\n";
        break;

    case E_USER_NOTICE:
        echo "<b>My NOTICE</b> [$errno] $errstr<br />\n";
        break;

    default:
        echo "Unknown error type: [$errno] $errstr<br />\n";
        break;
    }
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Hi, where did you get this code? just to check its credibility :) –  Rahul Prasad Oct 2 '12 at 20:24
1  
Gotta love PHP.net, so should be reliable ;) –  edwardmp Oct 2 '12 at 20:26

From the docs for set_error_handler() regarding the error handler:

The first parameter, errno, contains the level of the error raised, as an integer.

It will be one of the predefined error constants, e.g. E_USER_WARNING, E_NOTICE, etc.

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