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I am writing two classes which are to be used to evaluate expressions in equations, namely: Equation, and Expression. The Equation class contains two Expression* member variables that need to be used in order to mainpulate the right and left side of an equation. To address the matter of how they would access the expression each holds (a string), I had created the following definition and implementation for the Exression class's constructor:

#ifndef EXPRESSION_H
#define EXPRESSION_H
#include <string>

using namespace std;

class Expression
{
    private:
        int l, r;       

    public:
        Expression(string part);        
        string equationPart;


};
#endif



#include "Expression.h"
#include<cmath>
#include<iostream>
using namespace std;

Expression::Expression(string part)
{
    int len = part.length();
    equationPart[len];

    for(int i = 0; i < len; i++)
    {
        equationPart[i] = part[i];
    }   
}

I had also written the following for the Equation class's implementation:

#ifndef EQUATION_H
#define EQUATION_H
#include "Expression.h"
#include <string>

using namespace std;

class Equation
{
    public:
        Equation(string eq);
        ~Equation();
        int evaluateRHS();
        int evaluateLHS();
        void instantiateVariable(char name, int value);

    private:
        Expression* left;
        Expression* right;

};
#endif




#include "Equation.h"
#include<cmath>
#include<iostream>
#include<cstdlib>
#include<cstring>

using namespace std;

Equation::Equation(string eq)
{
    int length = eq.length();

    string l;
    string r;
    bool valid = false;
    short count = 0;

    for(int i = 0; i < length; i++)
    {
        if(eq[i] == '=')
        {
            valid = true;
            for(short j = i+1; j < length; j++)
            {
                r += eq[j];
            }

            for(short j = i-1; j > 0; j--)
            {
                count++;
            }

            for(short j = 0; j < count; j++)
            {
                l += eq[j];
            }   
        }   
    }

    if(valid == false) 
    {
        cout << "invalid equation" << endl;
    }
    else if(valid == true)
    {
        left = new Expression(l);
        right = new Expression(r);
    }
}

When I run the program as seen above, it compiles; but when I try to access the string member variable of the left and right Expression objects declared in Equation, like so:

void Equation::instantiateVariable(char name, int value)
{
    string s1 = left.equationPart; 
    string s2 = right.equationPart; 

    short length1 = s1.length();
    short length2 = s2.length();

    bool found1 = false;

    for(short i = 0; i < length1; i++)
    {
        found1 = true;
        if(left.equationPart[i] == name)
        {
            left.equationPart[i] = itoa(value);
        }          
    }

    //and so on...
}

I end up getting a compiler error:

error: request for member 'equationPart' in '((Equation*)this)->Equation::left', which is of non-class type 'Expression*'

This error crops up several times in the instantiateVariable function alone. Any help or advice would be greatly appreciated.

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Avoid putting "using namespace" directives in header files or anyone who #includes your file will end up with all the types from the std namespace exposed when they might not be expecting it. See: stackoverflow.com/questions/1452721/… –  Bleep Bloop Oct 2 '12 at 20:34

2 Answers 2

"left" is a pointer, which is accessed with "->". Change "left." to "left->"

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Both left and right are Expression pointers, so you need to access them via operator->, for example:

string s1 = left->equationPart; 
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