Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have lines of text, all with the same structure, and would like to make a permutation of 2 elements on all lines:

1257654 some text (which may be long) #Foo
1543098 some other text #Barbar
1238769 whatever #Baz
2456874 something else #Quux

I want to obtain :

#Foo some text (which may be long) 1257654
#Barbar some other text 1543098
#Baz whatever 1238769
#Quux something else 2456874

This is where I am stuck :

:%s/\(\d\{7\}\)\(#.\{-}\)/\2\1/

Where did I go wrong ?

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The problem with your substitution is that you only have two groups instead of three.

Your goal is to swap 1 and 3 around 2:

(1)(2)(3) --> (3)(2)(1)

So you need to have three groups in your pattern:

(1543098)( some other text )(#Barbar)

to be able to do:

(#Barbar)( some other text )(1543098)

This substitution seems to work:

:s/^\(\d\{7\}\)\(.*\)\(#\w*\)/\3\2\1

here is a shorter and prettier version thanks to verymagic:

:s/\v^(\d{7})(.*)(#\w*)/\3\2\1`
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for your solution (it works beautifully) and for your explanations. –  ThG Oct 3 '12 at 5:15
add comment

I'd do it

%s/\v^(\d{7})(.{-})\s*(#.*)$/\3\2 \1/

Haven't checked any of the other answers yet

The non-greedy match ({-}) is the key here

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your solution, which works as expected. Thanks again. –  ThG Oct 3 '12 at 5:17
add comment
:%s/^\(\d\{7\}\)\(.*\) \(#.*\)/\3\2 \1/

Might work for you.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Tried it, but got the answer : E488: Trailing characters (I made a copy-paste). Furthermore, why is it necessary to have 3 groups when 2 patterns only are concerned ? Would it be possible to have a "Regex-forensics" to explain it ? –  ThG Oct 2 '12 at 20:54
    
One group for the 1257654, one group for the #Foo, another group for what's between them. –  romainl Oct 2 '12 at 21:05
    
I don't think the / should be there between \2/\1, that's why you get trailing characters error. –  Tim Oct 2 '12 at 21:38
    
Corrected, sorry. –  Zsolt Botykai Oct 3 '12 at 6:51
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.