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I am wondering about the delete[] operator in C++. (I am using Visual Studio 2005).

I have an unmanaged DLL that is being called by a managed DLL. When I close this program after performing a few tasks while debugging, I am getting many (thousands?) of memory leaks, mostly 24 bytes - 44 bytes in size.. I suspect it might be due to a certain unmanaged DLL I have.

Anyway, from what I understand, if I have the following code:

char* pointer = new char[500]
/* some operations... */
delete[] pointer;

Then all the memory for it is freed up correctly, am I right?

What happens when I have the following code:

char* pointer = new char[500];
char* pointerIt = pointer;
/* some code perhaps to iterate over the whole memory block, like so */
for (int i = 0; i < 250; i++){ // only iterate halfway
    *pointerIt = 0;
    pointerIt++;
}

delete[] pointer;

The memory pointed to by pointer is deleted right? So it means that pointerIt is now not pointing to valid memory.. But that's ok because I can set both pointers to NULL, right?

Anyway, what happens now if I do this:

char* pointerFirstPosition = new char[500];
char* pointerIt = pointerFirstPosition;

for (int i = 0; i < 250; i++){ // only iterate halfway
    *pointerIt = 0;
    pointerIt++;
}

delete[] pointerIt; // delete the pointer iterator...

Will this code delete the memory block pointed to by pointerIt up to pointerIt +500? or will it delete the memory block pointed to by pointerFirstPos to pointerFirstPos +500?

Could this result in a memory leak?

Sorry for the long winded message, I'm trying to get my message across clearly.

Thanks,

kreb

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1  
"But that's ok because I can set both pointers to NULL, right?" Well, you should be done with the pointers... – GManNickG Aug 13 '09 at 3:03
up vote 4 down vote accepted

First question set:

char* pointer = new char[500] 
/* some operations... */ 
delete[] pointer;

Then all the memory for it is freed up correctly, am I right?

right.

Second question set:

char* pointer = new char[500];
char* pointerIt = pointer;
/* some code perhaps to iterate over the whole memory block, like so */
for (int i = 0; i < 250; i++){ // only iterate halfway
    *pointerIt = 0;
    pointerIt++;
}

delete[] pointer;

The memory pointed to by pointer is deleted right? So it means that pointerIt is now not pointing to valid memory.. But that's ok because I can set both pointers to NULL, right?

The memory pointer holds an address to is fully delted yes. Both pointer and pointerIt hold an address to invalid memory. Each pointer is simply a variable, and every variable is independent. So both store their own address independent of each other. The dereference operator * will simply give you the variable at that address. The variable at that address is a different variable than the pointer variable.

Third question set:

You should be deleting only the address that was allocated, the whole array. You'll have undefined results if you try to delete a partial array. Could it result in a memory leak? Possibly, could it result in a crash? Possibly, could it result in ....? Possibly.

So only delete what you allocate. If you allocate an array then you delete with delete[] if you delete a type that is not an array you delete with delete.

Here is an eample of something that is fine just for clarity:

char* pointer = new char[500];
char* pointerIt = pointer;
//This is fine because you are deleting the same address:
delete[] pointerIt;
//The memory that both variables point to is freed, do not try to free again
share|improve this answer
2  
It is undefined to delete or delete[] anything other than what was created using new or new[]. – GManNickG Aug 13 '09 at 3:06
    
Thanks, that was what I suspected. But say, for example in the third question set, I set pointerIt = pointerFirstPosition, then delete[] pointerIt, is this still undefined? I'm working with someone else's OLD code, he already left the company, and I'm trying to figure out if this is the reason for the memory leaks.. – krebstar Aug 13 '09 at 3:12
    
Just for kicks I tested this out under g++ 4.4.1 -- basically the same code as what you've got in your third code sample except with pointerIt moved halfway down the array. Calling delete[] on pointerIt invalidates pointer, but obviously this behaviour cannot be expected from every compiler if the behaviour is undefined. – Meredith L. Patterson Aug 13 '09 at 3:14
    
@krebstar: I think I covered that in section #3. – Brian R. Bondy Aug 13 '09 at 3:17
    
Thanks Meredith, I'm not so much concerned about invalidating pointer, but as to whether the memory is actually freed. I guess my question is, does running the third set cause a leak of 250 bytes (the 250 byte locations prior to the last position of pointerIt)? Does it corrupt the 250 memory locations after pointerFirstPos+500 by freeing memory that it didn't allocate? Thanks :) – krebstar Aug 13 '09 at 3:19

check out boost::shared_ptr or boost::scoped_ptr and NEVER worry about this again. This gives you a static & reference counted way to manage your memory.

http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_39_0/libs/smart_ptr/shared_ptr.htm

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1  
If I do this I'll have to modify so many projects.. :( Something my manager can't justify. – krebstar Aug 13 '09 at 3:22
    
For future code, then. Also, use std::vector and kin. No manually memory allocations ever. – GManNickG Aug 13 '09 at 3:24
    
Ok, thanks guys, very helpful :) – krebstar Aug 13 '09 at 3:25
    
@George: Note that the code would require shared_array. (Or, indeed, std::vector.) – sbi Aug 13 '09 at 10:33
    
@krebstar that's a different question. char* pointer = new char[500] you could just use std::string if you're doing i/o processing, use streams 'something my manager can't justify' - just do it :) – George Godik Aug 14 '09 at 15:34

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