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In SystemVerilog, one can use the disable construct to terminate named blocks or tasks. But I found today that disabling a task within a class instance affects all copies of the task in all class instances.

Consider a class which has a few tasks defined within it. If, internal to the class, there is a call to disable <taskname>, this will disable all copies of the task across all instances of the class. This is not the behavior I expected, but it is correct according to the LRM:

If a task is enabled more than once, then disabling such a task shall disable all activations of the task.

Is there a mechanism or workaround to disable only the task within a specific instance of a class?

The code below highlights the problem I am facing. Basically, I have a timer task which I want to disable due to some other event. This is all contained within a class. In my verification environment I have multiple instances of this class and they operate entirely independently. So disabling the timer within one instance should not affect the others. But the way disable works it is affecting the other instances.

I tried disable this.timer but that did not compile.

In this example, I have two instances of class c which contains a timer task. There is a disabler task which is started in parallel which makes the call to disable timer. The intent in this example is for timer to get disabled half-way through its count. So c1 would get disabled at time 5, and c2 would get disabled at time 10. However, they both are disabled at time 5, because the disable timer call originating in c1 disables the task in both c1 and c2.

module top();

  class c;

    string name;
    int    count;

    function new(string _name, int _count);
      name  = _name;
      count = _count;
    endfunction

    task t1();
      timer();
      $display("%t %s timer completed", $time, name);
    endtask

    task run();
      fork
        t1();
        disabler();
      join
    endtask

    task timer();
      $display("%t %s starting timer with count=%0d", $time, name, count);
      repeat(count) #1;
    endtask

    task disabler();
      repeat(count/2) #1;
      disable timer;
    endtask

  endclass

  class ex;

    c c1;
    c c2;

    function new();
      c1 = new("c1", 10);
      c2 = new("c2", 20);
    endfunction

    task run();
      fork
        c1.run();
        c2.run();
      join_none
    endtask

  endclass

  ex e = new;

  initial begin
    e.run();
  end

endmodule

Output:

               0 c1 starting timer with count=10
               0 c2 starting timer with count=20
               5 c2 timer completed
               5 c1 timer completed

I know I could rewrite this to get it to work without using disable, but it's such an easy way to terminate a task early that I'm hoping there is something I'm missing.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I don't think this is possible. Even using disable on named blocks will still stop all instances of that task.

Disabling an automatic task or a block inside an automatic task proceeds as for regular tasks for all concurrent executions of the task.

You could try to use a process class. I've never used them myself so this code likely contains errors.

class c;
process p1;

task run();
  fork
    begin
      p1 = process::self(); //Get process of this begin..end block
      $display("%t %s starting timer with count=%0d", $time, name, count);
      repeat(count) #1;
    end
    disabler()
  join_none
endtask

task disabler();
  wait (p1 != null);
  repeat(count/2) #1;
  p1.kill();
endtask
share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks. I had tried using the process class already but could not get it to work. I revisited that and was able to make it work; the key is that the task/procedures that should be killed need to be in their own fork/join so they are in a separate process. So - it is possible, but not using disable. But I'm not sure it's worth the effort and complexity. –  dwikle Oct 3 '12 at 17:09
class a1; 
  process p1; 

  task timer();
    p1=process::self();
    begin
      while(1)
      begin
        $display("example data %t",$time);
        #10;
      end 
    end 
  endtask

  task timer2();
    for(int i = 0; i < 10; i ++) 
    begin
      #20;
      $display("shouldnot killed",i);
    end
  endtask

endclass

module example_kill;
  a1 ab,bc;
  initial begin 
    ab = new();
    bc= new();
    fork 
    ab.timer();
    ab.timer2();
    bc.timer();
    join_none
    #50; 
    ab.p1.kill();
    #100;
    bc.p1.kill();
    wait fork;
  end
endmodule
share|improve this answer
    
killing the task of one instance willnot affect the other instance task.. –  Narasimha Nov 25 '13 at 13:42

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