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I have three separate queries that I'd like to combine into a single query if possible. The intent is to find users that exist in any two of the three tables. They must exist AT LEAST two of the three tables.

user (user table)
user_job_ft_job (full time job)
user_job_own_venture (startup/own venture)
user_job_not_looking (not seeking employment)

-- not seeking and full time
SELECT * from user_job_not_looking ujnl, user_job_ft_job uj, [user] u  
WHERE 1=1
AND ujnl.user_id = u.user_id
AND uj.user_id = u.user_id    

-- own venture and full time   
SELECT * from user_job_own_venture ujov, user_job_ft_job uj, [user] u   
WHERE 1=1
AND ujov.user_id = u.user_id
AND uj.user_id = u.user_id 

-- own venture and not looking
SELECT * from user_job_own_venture ujov, user_job_not_looking ujnl, [user] u   
WHERE 1=1
AND ujov.user_id = u.user_id
AND ujnl.user_id = u.user_id   

I'd like to somehow combine these queries into one larger query so that I can an easier time writing dynamic code to handle this business case.

The structure of the tables shouldn't matter, other than knowing they all have a foreign key called user_id which is the primary key of the [user] table.

share|improve this question
1  
why use three tables for users? Is it possible to just combine the tables and add a user_type_id field? That would seem like the most intuitive way to do things. You would eliminate all the copied data between each table. –  Benjamin Danger Johnson Oct 2 '12 at 21:31
    
Actually I guess you would need two fields, one for seeking/venture and one for fulltime/notlooking –  Benjamin Danger Johnson Oct 2 '12 at 21:31
    
The users exist in the [user] table. Each of the other tables is a "job" table that stores a job that could be associated with a user. I'd like to know how to do this without making changes to the data model. –  Adam Levitt Oct 2 '12 at 21:31
    
what is the structure for these 3 tables? –  amphibient Oct 2 '12 at 21:32
    
The structure of the tables shouldn't matter, other than knowing they each have a foreign key called user_id which is the primary key of the [user] table. –  Adam Levitt Oct 2 '12 at 21:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Left outer joins will cause the query to attempt to join on a table, but not require that child-table to have a matching record. If it doesn't have a matching record, the fields from that table would be null. This query should do what you need.

select * from [user] u
left outer join user_job_not_looking as ujnl on ujnl.user_id=u.user_id
left outer join user_job_own_venture as ujov on ujov.user_id=u.user_id
left outer join user_job_ft_job as uj on uj.user_id=user_id
where 
(ujnl.user_id is not null and ujov.user_id is not null) or
(ujnl.user_id is not null and uj.user_id is not null) or
(ujov.user_id is not null and uj.user_id is not null)
share|improve this answer
    
This is 100% the answer I was looking for. Thanks a bunch! –  Adam Levitt Oct 2 '12 at 21:40
    
damn, beaten to the punch. –  Benjamin Danger Johnson Oct 2 '12 at 21:42

If you don't want to restructure, try a query like this:

SELECT
    *
FROM
    user
    FULL JOIN user_job_not_looking AS ujnl ON ujnl.user_id = user.user_id
    FULL JOIN user_job_own_venture AS ujov ON ujov.user_id = user.user_id
    FULL JOIN user_job_ft_job AS ujfj ON ujfj.user_id = user.user_id
WHERE
    (ujnl.user_id IS NOT NULL AND ujov.user_id IS NOT NULL) OR
    (ujnl.user_id IS NOT NULL AND ujfj.user_id IS NOT NULL) OR
    (ujov.user_id IS NOT NULL AND ujfj.user_id IS NOT NULL)
share|improve this answer
    
Yep, this works too. Looks good! Thanks. –  Adam Levitt Oct 2 '12 at 21:42

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