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I have a table of data that has a state and city column. I have sorted the table based on the two columns appropriately, however I am actually looking to just count the number of rows per each state and then another by cities for statistical analysis.

How do I count the unique entries in those columns and then display them in another portion of the table or in another table in the spreadsheet document? I am assuming that doing this programmatically may be best.

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Use a Pivot Table? –  Siddharth Rout Oct 2 '12 at 21:30
    
Interesting, I've only used pivot tables in the past for other scenarios, but I've not used Excel very much over the past 10 years to be honest. –  ylluminate Oct 2 '12 at 21:31
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Give it a try and if you get stuck post back ;) –  Siddharth Rout Oct 2 '12 at 21:32
    
+1 for the pivot table option –  nutsch Oct 2 '12 at 21:36
    
I really liked that answer that had been added but was quickly deleted as it showed a programatic way to handle this it appeared. Can we have that back? –  ylluminate Oct 2 '12 at 21:37
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2 Answers

How do I count the unique entries in those columns and then display them in another portion of the table or in another table in the spreadsheet document? I am assuming that doing this programmatically may be best.

Something like this will be perfect

=SUM(IF(FREQUENCY(A2:A10,A2:A10)>0,1))  

This formula will give the result you are looking for. You may wish to change it to

=SUM(IF(FREQUENCY(A:A,A:A)>0,1))

And it will summarize the entire A column without requiring a range.


I've undeleted this answer after your request, however, I am unsure it will do exactly what you are looking for as the first 1/2 of your question seemingly conflicts with the second half.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I have to say that a PivotTable does the trick. After about 3 minutes of playing around it became rather clear, although I have to say that the MS Office 2011 release I'm on is not very intuitive with regards to where to actually go.

Notwithstanding, I really liked @enderland's recommendation. True it was not the solution exactly, but I usually prefer programatic approaches for solutions. Thanks for that!

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