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I have a LoggerBase class, it looks like:

    public class BatchLoggerBase : IDisposable
    {
        protected string LogFilePath { private get; set; }
        protected object _synRoot;

        BatchLoggerBase(string logFilePath)
        {
            LogFilePath = logFilePath;
        }

        protected virtual void WriteToLog(string message)
        {
            Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
            {
                lock (_synRoot)
                {
                    System.IO.File.AppendAllText(LogFilePath, message);
                }
            });
        }
        //Other code... 
    }

I have another class inherit from this base class, like:

public sealed class TransactionBatchLogger : BatchLoggerBase
{
    public TransactionBatchLogger()
    {
         _synRoot = new object();
         string directory = AppDomain.CurrentDomain.BaseDirectory + ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["Batch.TransactionLog.Path"];
            if (!Directory.Exists(directory))
                Directory.CreateDirectory(directory);

            LogFilePath = string.Format("{0}{1}_{2}.txt", directory, "TransactionLog", DateTime.Now.ToString("yyyy-MM-dd"));
    }
public void LogLoyaltyPointProcess(IEnumerable<CustomerTierOverrideItem> listOfCustomerTierItem)
        {
            Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
            {
                //Construct message...
                WriteToLog(message);
            });
        }
}

public sealed class LoyaltyPointBatchLogger : BatchLoggerBase
{
    public LoyaltyPointBatchLogger()
        {
            _synRoot = new object();

            string directory = AppDomain.CurrentDomain.BaseDirectory + ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["Batch.LoyaltyPointLog.Path"];
            if (!Directory.Exists(directory))
                Directory.CreateDirectory(directory);

            LogFilePath = string.Format("{0}{1}_{2}.txt", directory, "LoyaltyPointLog", DateTime.Now.ToString("yyyy-MM-dd"));
        }
public void LogLoyaltyPointProcess(IEnumerable<CustomerTierOverrideItem> listOfCustomerTierItem)
        {
            Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
            {
                //Construct message...
                WriteToLog(message);
            });
        }
}

The LoyaltyPointBatchLogger and TransactionBatchLogger write log content to different log files(one is for transactionLog, another one is for LoayltyPointLog), but they all call same virtual method from base class.

The batch program process data batch by batch(like, 45000 total data and 10000 each batch) these two logger may called by different batches successively, so I do not want the log files are accessed by different batches logger thread.

The Question is: Should I instantiate the _synRoot in derived class LoyaltyPointBatchLogger and TransactionBatchLogger, or in base class ?

_synRoot instantiated in LoyaltyPointBatchLogger and TransactionBatchLogger are different references, so the LoyaltyPointBatchLogger and TransactionBatchLogger will not wait each other when they go into lock statement, right?

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Are LoyaltyPointBatchLogger and TransactionBatchLogger essentially managed elsewhere as singletons? If you instantiate two or more TransactionBatchLoggers, they won't share the same lock. –  Chris Sinclair Oct 2 '12 at 21:43
    
They are currently not singletons, I probably considering to implement them as singleton. But in my current context, LoyaltyPointBatchLogger and TransactionBatchLogger are only have one instance. Do you mean as long as they only have on instance, the code should be no problem? Is instantiating _synRoot object in derived classes a right approach? –  Jeff Chen Oct 2 '12 at 21:51
    
I don't know if it's the "right" approach; I haven't had the need to use SyncRoots before. But with your current implementation, each instance will create its own syncroot lock object. That means if you call new TransactionBatchLogger() in one place, then another new TransactionBatchLogger() elsewhere, they will not share the same locks and will interfere with each other. –  Chris Sinclair Oct 2 '12 at 21:53
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I haven't had any experience using a "syncroot" locking pattern, but if I understand your question correctly, if I would attack this by having each subclass type declare its own unique SyncRoot statically by type. This way all instances of that type share the same SyncRoot. Additionally, I would require that the base logger be provided a SyncRoot object via the constructor rather than hope that the subclass assigns it (and assigns it in time). Additionally, I would make it immutable so subclasses can't do evil stuff.

BatchLoggerBase

public abstract class BatchLoggerBase
{
    protected readonly object SyncRoot;

    protected BatchLoggerBase(object syncRoot)
    {
        if (syncRoot == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("syncRoot");

        this.SyncRoot = syncRoot;
    }
}

LoyaltyPointBatchLogger

public class LoyaltyPointBatchLogger : BatchLoggerBase
{
    private static readonly object LOYALTY_SYNC_ROOT = new object();

    public LoyaltyPointBatchLogger()
        : base(LOYALTY_SYNC_ROOT)
    {

    }
}

TransactionBatchLogger

public class TransactionBatchLogger : BatchLoggerBase
{
    private static readonly object TRANSACTION_SYNC_ROOT = new object();

    public TransactionBatchLogger()
        : base(TRANSACTION_SYNC_ROOT)
    {

    }
}

EDIT: Note that this still means subclasses can ignore your intent. For example:

public class EvilBatchLogger : BatchLoggerBase
{
    public EvilBatchLogger()
        : base(new object())
    {

    }
}

var evil1 = new EvilBatchLogger();
var evil2 = new EvilBatchLogger();

In this case, evil and evil2 will not share the same locking object and can interfere. But if you have control over the logger implementations, you can avoid shooting yourself in the foot.

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Instantiation happens in base class, syncRoot is an instance field ⇒ each instance of the base class or any of its descendants synchronizes concurrent access on a per-instance basis.

Instantiation happens in base class, syncRoot is a static field ⇒ all instances of the base class or any of its descendants synchronize concurrent access on a 'singleton' basis.

Instantiation happens in derived class, syncRoot is instantiated in the constructor ⇒ each instance of the base class or any of its descendants synchronize concurrent access on a per-instance basis.

Instantiation happens in derived class, syncRoot is a static field declared and instantiated in the derived class ⇒ all instances of each derived class synchronize concurrent access on a per-derived-class (type) basis.

Note: The last case corresponds to what Chris Sinclair suggested in his answer.

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2  
Thanks for the comparison of the options. But your fourth option, shouldn't it be "Instantiation happens in derived class" not "Instantiation happens in base class"? –  Chris Sinclair Oct 2 '12 at 22:06
    
Yes, thanks, typical copy&paste error. –  Ondrej Tucny Oct 3 '12 at 6:39
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