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I have an assignment, and im beating my head against the wall. It is in C. I have a feeling im close to the solution, however I cant get the program to do whats required. I am changing the numbers and some small details, because most of the class is as stumped as I.

Requirements: Create 3 processes, the first one will increment a shared memory variable "total->value" from 1 to 10000, the second from 10000 to 12000, the third from 12000 to 14000

The process functions are labeled such (process1(), process2(), process3()) and the internals of those functions are as follows

process1()
{
   int k = 0;
   while (k < 10000)
   {
      k++;
      total->value = total->value + 1;
   }
   printf("From process 1 = %d/n", total->value);
}

The second would be k < 2000 (because it only needs to increment the shared value 2000 more) and etc.

The main portion of the program is:

main()
{
   int shmid;
   int pid1;
   int pid2;
   int pid3;
   int ID;
   int status;
   char *shmadd = (char *)0;

   /* Create and connect to a shared memory segmentt */
   if ((shmid = shmget(SHMKEY, sizeof (int), IPC_CREAT | 0666)) < 0)
   {
      perror("shmget");
      exit(1);
   }

   if ((total = (shared_mem *)shmat(shmid, shmadd, 0)) == (shared_mem *)-1)
   {
      perror("shmat");
      exit(0);
   }

   total->value = 0;

   if ((pid1 = fork()) == 0)
      process1();

   if ((pid1 != 0) && (pid2 = fork()) == 0)
      process2();

   if ((pid1 != 0) && (pid2 != 0) && (pid3 = fork()) == 0)
      process3();

   if ((pid1 != 0) && (pid2 != 0) && (pid3 != 0))
   {
      if ((shmctl(shmid, IPC_RMID, (struct shmid_ds *)0)) == -1)
      {
         perror("shmctl");
         exit(-1);
      }
      printf("\t\t  End of Program.\n");
   }
}

What I need is for the first process to finish, before the 2nd starts. I tried inserting a wait(&status) after the process1() (or 2 or 3) calls and am at a loss. Any pointers? (no pun intended) =) there is more to implement, but I believe once I have this part I can handle the rest on my own. I have been intentionally vague in some regards, but I would like to finish this project and more importantly understand it and there are others who want a free lunch. I will provide anything else in the code that is required. Thank you in advance for your help

The output should appear

From process 1 = 10000  
From process 2 = 12000  
From process 3 = 14000  
share|improve this question
1  
Somethings tells me you're not SUPPOSED to wait for the first process to complete before the second process starts but rather use synchronization primitives like semaphores in the shared memory segment to make the second and third processes wait until it's time to do their work. As an aside: I think you have a problem because you destroy the shared memory segment with IPC_RMID while all three processes are still using it. – Celada Oct 3 '12 at 0:52

I believe that Celada's comment/guess on the requirements is correct. However, barring that, and at the risk of doing too much work, the following code fulfills your spec. The use of the gcc built-in __sync_fetch_and_add() is perhaps unnecessary.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <sys/ipc.h>
#include <sys/shm.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/wait.h>

static struct {
   int value;
} *total;

static void process1(void) { 
   int k = 0;  
   while (k < 10000) {  
      k++;  
      __sync_fetch_and_add(&total->value, 1);  
    }  
    printf("From process 1 = %d\n", total->value); //<-- not quite right: could be >10000
}

static void process2(void) { 
   int k = 0;
   while (__sync_fetch_and_add(&total->value, 0) != 10000)
      ;
   while (k < 2000) {  
      k++;  
      __sync_fetch_and_add(&total->value, 1);  
   }  
   printf("From process 2 = %d\n", total->value);
}

static void process3(void) { 
   int k = 0;  
   while (__sync_fetch_and_add(&total->value, 0) != 12000)
      ;
   while (k < 2000) {  
      k++;  
      __sync_fetch_and_add(&total->value, 1);  
    }  
    printf("From process 3 = %d\n", total->value);
}

int main(void) {
   int   shmid;
   int   pid1;
   int   pid2;
   int   pid3;
   int   status;

   /* Create and connect to a shared memory segment */
   if ((shmid = shmget(1234, sizeof *total, IPC_CREAT|0666)) < 0) {
      perror ("shmget");
      exit (1);
   }
   if ((total = shmat(shmid, 0, 0)) == (void *)-1) {
      perror("shmat");
      exit (0);
   }
   total->value = 0; // not necessary in Linux if IPC_CREAT invoked

   if (!(pid1 = fork()))
      process1();
   else if (!(pid2 = fork()))
      process2();
   else if (!(pid3 = fork()))
      process3();
   else {
      wait(&status);
      wait(&status);
      wait(&status);
      if ((shmctl(shmid, IPC_RMID, (struct shmid_ds *) 0)) == -1) {
         perror("shmctl");
         exit (-1);
      }
      printf("\t\t  End of Program.\n");
   }
   return 0;
} 
share|improve this answer
    
EDIT: you don't really need the three child processes running all at once: just fork the first, and then wait for it to complete, and similarly for the second, and third. This is assuming Celada's guess is incorrect. – Joseph Quinsey Oct 3 '12 at 1:30
    
EDIT 2: As noted in the comments in my code, the printf()'s for 10000 and 12000 might be not quite right; simplest solution is just to hard-code the numbers, if that is OK. – Joseph Quinsey Oct 3 '12 at 1:41
    
EDIT 3: I'm usually careful to have a child process terminate via _exit() rather than exit(). But the difference probably doesn't matter here. – Joseph Quinsey Oct 3 '12 at 1:48
    
The code you gave me follows the "slides" I was working off of closely, but most of the time process 3 finishes first, or if it does finish 1, 2, it hangs before 3 ever completes. Any ideas? – Marc Punzirudu Oct 3 '12 at 3:00
1  
C, I removed the macros for fetch and add and just addressed the variable directly, worked like a charm. gcc, using fedora 3.5.4. That macro wouldnt compile on the Athlon machines we use for test. It is for Itanium based processors from what I could reference anywho. – Marc Punzirudu Oct 4 '12 at 2:19

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