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In this article, it says that ActionScript 3.0 conforms to ECMA 4th edition. But instead of looking like JavaScript and having no class or extend, ActionScript 3.0 code looks like Java and have the class statement and even have extend?

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4 Answers 4

Actionscript 3 was designed while the ECMA 4 spec was still under development. It's divergent; it conforms to ECMA 4 but goes beyond it.

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Actionscript was compliant with ECMA from the very start.

You could imagine javascript & actionscript as a fork from a single standard ie ECMA, With Javascript inclined to add power to browsers while Actionscript geared towards flash development.

Seems fair since every company at one time was in a bid to create own version. For eg, Consider the Microsoft's version of ECMA.

You might also consider from the very link you shared that :

In response to user demand for a language better equipped for larger and more complex applications, ActionScript 2.0 featured compile-time type checking and class-based syntax, such as the keywords class and extends.

So you could see that most of the changes were really user driven, rather than a co-incidental similarity.

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Because the ECMAScript 4th Edition draft that ActionScript 3 is based on had class and extends and so on.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ECMAScript#ECMAScript.2C_4th_Edition

http://www.ecma-international.org/activities/Languages/Language%20overview.pdf

Later, the 4th Edition draft was replaced by ECMAScript Harmony:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ECMAScript#History_2

Some would say that the reason for this was business politics, but you would have to form your own informed opinion on that.

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In general, to be standard compliant does not mean that only the features defined by the standard have to be available. You can implement a standard to be compliant but you can also implement additional functionality.

You can treat ECMA Script as a kind of subset that defines the basic language structure, syntax and semantics. Then ECMA is only a subset of ActionScript. The language adds a wide range of features to this subset.

Another example could be MySQL. It implements the SQL standard but provides much more functionality like the standard would do.

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