Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following class and subclass:

@interface NSHigh : NSObject
@property (nonatomic, strong) NSArray *array;
@end
@implementation NSHigh
-(NSArray*)array
{
    _array = [[NSArray alloc] init];
    return _array;
}
@end

@interface NSLow : NSHigh
@end
@implementation NSLow
/* synthesizing makes the assertion FAIL. NO synthesizing makes the assertion PASS */
@synthesize array;
@end

Then I run this code somewhere:

NSLow *low = [[NSLow alloc] init];
assert(low.array);

So, apparently, if in the subclass NSLow I synthesize the array property, then the getter from the super class does not get called, and the assertion fails.

If I do not synthesize, then the superclass getter is called, and the assertion passes.

  1. Why does this happen?
  2. How would I access the array instance variable in the NSLow subclass without calling self.array every time?
share|improve this question
6  
Don't prefix your class names with NS. This is reserved by Apple. –  Jonathan Grynspan Oct 3 '12 at 0:52
    
@JonathanGrynspan is this a precautionary measure, or will Apple reject the application as well? –  moby Oct 3 '12 at 1:15
1  
Call it a language requirement. –  Jonathan Grynspan Oct 3 '12 at 1:16
    
For those who are interested, NS stands for NeXTSTEP where the Cocoa frameworks originally came from: stackoverflow.com/a/473866/159758 –  DonnaLea Oct 22 '13 at 11:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

@synthesize in NSLow will create the following getter:

- (NSArray *)array {
    return _array;
}

So, your array is never initialized and nil is returned.

You generally shouldn't use @synthesize for @properties that are declared in a superclass.

Also, you shouldn't implement a getter like the one in NSHigh. If you want to init that array lazily you should do it like this:

- (NSArray *)array {
    if (!_array) {
        _array = [[NSArray alloc] init];
    }
    return _array;
}

Finally, you shouldn't use NS prefix.

EDIT:

If you want direct access to your ivar in the subclass, you can explicitly declare it in the header like this:

@interface NSHigh : NSObject {
    NSArray *_array;
}
@property (nonatomic, strong) NSArray *array;
@end

This will allow you to access the ivar in your subclasses too.

share|improve this answer
    
So I would have to explicitly call self.property from all subclasses? There's no other way around this? What's the reasoninng for this? –  moby Oct 3 '12 at 0:03
    
Yes. What's wrong with that? –  DrummerB Oct 3 '12 at 0:08
    
But if you really want direct access, you can explicitly declare your ivar in the superclasses interface. –  DrummerB Oct 3 '12 at 0:08
    
@DrummerB Will a synthesized getter use the _array ivar? That is, with an underscore prefix? –  millimoose Oct 3 '12 at 0:14
1  
Shouldn't that if (_array) ... be if (!_array) ...? –  Rob Oct 3 '12 at 1:48

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.