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My apologies if this is the wrong site for this problem, as it is more math-related than programming.I am trying to write a series of 7 page links, in a Google-esque fashion. Essentially, it will be 7 numbers, where s is my starting value. I am having trouble calculating my starting value.

In advance, the maximum value in the series is variable depending on the search terms provided by the user, it could be less than, greater than or equal to 7. In my formula-writing attempts, I have been calling this value g. I also know the page number the user has selected. I have been calling this value p So, for example, if g was 21, I would need to generate these series of numbers, where the bolded number is equal to p:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

4 5 6 7 8 9 10

5 6 7 8 9 10 11

15 16 17 18 19 20 21

As long as I can determine the starting value using the information available, everything else falls into place. Can anyone advise on how I would calculate my starting value using the information available? If it is relevant, I will be writing this formula in PHP.

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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Suppose you want $n links and $g is the number of pages, in your case $n = 7, the the starting value $s can only range from 1 to $g - ($n - 1).

In general, when you are not outside these limits the starting value $s is related to the page number by $s = $p - floor($n / 2).

Putting all this together into a PHP function you get:

// $p -- user's current page
// $g -- total number of pages
// $n -- number of links
function start_link($p, $g, $n)
{
    $s = $p - floor($n / 2);
    if($s < 1)
    {
        return 1;
    }
    $max_s = $g - ($n - 1);
    if($s > $max_s)
    {
        return $max_s;
    }
    return $s;
}

You can test this function as follows:

print start_link(1,21,7) . "\n";
print start_link(2,21,7) . "\n";
print start_link(3,21,7) . "\n";
print start_link(4,21,7) . "\n";
print start_link(7,21,7) . "\n";
print start_link(8,21,7) . "\n";

This will print the start pages of example sequences you gave in your question.

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It's not a formula, it's an algorithm (as it involves a series of iterative steps... unless you're using Haskell).

Here's the algorithm I use:

Int32[] CreateLinks(Int32 currentPageNumber, Int32 totalPages) {
    Int32[] links = new Int32[ Math.Min( totalPages, 10 ) ];
    Int32 start = currentPageNumber < 5 ? 1 : currentPageNumber;
    start = currentPageNumber > totalPages - 5 ? totalPages - 10 : start;
    for(int i=0;i<links.Length;i++) {
        links[i] = start + i;
    }
}

Where the Int32[] array is the set of page links. Note my implementation has a hidden bug, can you see it?

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Here's the (PHP) code i finally wrote to do this. But this code actually calculates the start and stop page for 9(not 7) search page links.

if ($pagecount < 1) $start_page = 0;
else{
    $hyperlink_start_page = $hyperlink_end_page = $current_page;
    $hyperlink_start_page = $hyperlink_start_page - 4;
    $offset = 0;

    if ($hyperlink_start_page < 1 ){
        $offset = 1 - $hyperlink_start_page;
        $hyperlink_start_page = 1;
    }

    $hyperlink_end_page = $hyperlink_end_page + 4 + $offset;
    $offset = 0;

    if ($hyperlink_end_page > $lastpage ){
        $offset = $hyperlink_end_page - $pagecount;
        $hyperlink_end_page = $pagecount;
    }

    $hyperlink_start_page = $hyperlink_start_page - $offset;
    if ($hyperlink_start_page < 1 ) $hyperlink_start_page = 1;
}
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Assuming you know the 'page' number the user is on, and the number of items per page, in this example we are going to use 10...

if you're on page 1, you obviously want to show items 1-10. On page 2, you will want to show 11-20.

The easiest way to calculate the starting point, is to do ($pageNumber * $maxPerPage) - ($maxPerPage - 1)

in other words, on page one, it will look like (1 * 10) - (10 - 1), which equals 1.

Page 2 is (2 * 10) - (10 - 1) which equals 11.

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Why was this downvoted? It works... –  Justin Wood Oct 4 '12 at 14:50
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