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I have a text editing program that hands out cursors to other parts of the program that require it. The cursor consists of a two part list, [start, end], which needs to be updated every time text is inserted/removed (the start/end index gets moved forward or backwards).

When the cursor is no longer used, I want to stop updating it, since there are many and they are time consuming to update. By not in use, I mean that the object that requested it no longer references it - it no longer cares about it. (For example: it has a list of cursors to all search results for the word 'bob', and a new search was made for the word 'fred', so now it replaces its result list with a new list of new cursors... the old list and its cursors are no longer used.)

I can require that any object using the cursor calls a .finished() method when it no longer needs it. But it would be easier if I could detect when it is no longer being referenced by anything outside of the editor. How do I check this in python (I know the garbage cleanup maintains a list, and deletes it when no longer referenced)?

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What exactly is your definition of "using" a cursor? –  Matt Ball Oct 3 '12 at 1:00
    
The object that requested it no longer references it - it no longer cares about it. (For example: it has a list of cursors to all search results for the word 'bob', and a new search was made for the word 'fred', so now it replaces its result list with a new list of new cursors... the old list and its cursors are no longer used.) –  Jeff Oct 3 '12 at 1:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Use a weak reference from the weakref module to hold your cursor reference.

When the referent of a weak reference no longer has any strong (normal) references to it, the weakref will resolve to None.

>>> import weakref
>>> class Cursor: pass
... 
>>> _ = None # suppress special _ variable
>>> a = Cursor()
>>> r = weakref.ref(a)
>>> print r()
<__main__.Cursor instance at 0x1004a2bd8>
>>> del a
>>> print r()
None

You can put all those weakrefs in a collection (or use WeakKeyDictionary, WeakValueDictionary, or WeakSet) to keep track of the various cursors you have to update.

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In addition to what @nneonneo said, you should periodically scan through your list of cursor weak references and cull out the Nones otherwise you will end up with an ever growing list of Nones

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Note that the weakref module provides WeakSet which automatically discards deleted elements :) –  nneonneo Oct 3 '12 at 1:14
    
@nneonneo, cool. Docs don't mention whether the objects need to be hashable or not...seems they don't –  gnibbler Oct 3 '12 at 1:20
    
Elements probably do have to be hashable, since it's a set. AFAIK it doesn't have the iteration-size-changed problems that dictionaries do, but don't quote me on it. –  nneonneo Oct 3 '12 at 1:23
    
@nneonneo, you can add your Cursor instances to a WeakSet with no problems. The implementation could just be using the id() –  gnibbler Oct 3 '12 at 1:24
    
Class instances are actually always hashable unless you override __eq__ but not __hash__ (if memory serves) –  nneonneo Oct 3 '12 at 1:25

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