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I'm digging OOP for the first time but I've got a little problem:

var panel = {    
    img : imgs[24],
    prop : this.img.height / this.img.width,

    h : this.img.height - (scale),
    w : h/prop,

    x : center.x - (w / 2),
    y : center.y - (h / 2)    
}

panel.draw = function(){    
   g.ctx.drawImage(this.img,
      0, 0,
      this.img.width, this.img.height,
      this.x, this.y,
      this.w, this.h)
}

But it looks like declaring this.img.height results in typeError. Can someone explain why?

Also, how can I declare the method inside the object declaration? Nothing special about it: I just don't want my code to look too messy.

share|improve this question
    
I may have missed something, but what is "scale" in this example referring to? –  Jordan Denison Oct 3 '12 at 1:05
    
don't worry: it is a variable declared elsewhere in the code :) I could remove it but I would still get the same typeError –  Saturnix Oct 3 '12 at 1:06
    
What kind of objects are stored in the "imgs" array? –  Satyajit Oct 3 '12 at 1:09
1  
Hint: this is not the object you are look^H^H^H^H trying to refer to –  Ray Toal Oct 3 '12 at 1:14

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Is your object always static to the name panel? Then

var panel = {};
panel.img = imgs[24];
panel.prop = panel.img.height / panel.img.width;
...

Is it not static but you don't want instances of it? Then make an initialisation function to get the correct this

var panel = {   // assuming "scale" and "center" in scope
        init : function(){
            this.img = imgs[24];
            this.prop = this.img.height / this.img.width;
            this.h = this.img.height - (scale);
            this.w = this.h / this.prop;
            this.x = center.x - (this.w / 2);
            this.y = center.y - (this.h / 2);
        }
};
panel.init();
...

Do you want to have multiple instances of the object? Then make a constructor

function Panel (img) { // assuming "scale" and "center" in scope
    this.img = img;
    this.prop = img.height / img.width;
    this.h = img.height - (scale);
    this.w = this.h / this.prop;
    this.x = center.x - (this.w / 2);
    this.y = center.y - (this.h / 2);
}
Panel..draw = function(){
...

and use with var panel = new Panel( imgs[24] );

share|improve this answer
    
This won't work prop : panel.img.height / panel.img.width. You can't refer to an object during its instantiation when using literal syntax. During its creation, panel will be undefined. –  I Hate Lazy Oct 3 '12 at 1:29
1  
You are correct, I'll fix this --- Fixed –  Paul S. Oct 3 '12 at 1:32
    
everything have much more sense now. Thanks! –  Saturnix Oct 3 '12 at 1:46

It's because this will never be a reference to the object you're creating when using object literal syntax.

It's a reference to the outer variable scope. To use literal syntax, you'll need to create the parts that do not require a self reference, then create rest after the initialization.

var panel = {    
    img : imgs[24],

    w : h/prop,

    x : center.x - (w / 2),
    y : center.y - (h / 2)    
};
panel.prop = panel.img.height / panel.img.width;
panel.h = panel.img.height - scale;

I don't know what your h and prop variables are supposed to refer to.

If you expect them to refer to members of the object, then you need to take those out as well. And the center variable just seems to come out of nowhere.

Seems like maybe you're just guessing at how JavaScript syntax works. If so, that's a hard way to learn. I'd recommend a basic tutorial before you continue.

share|improve this answer

You are refering to different object even if thinking you are not doing that. So in your example, on third line this is refering current scope and not the object panel you are creating. So do img and h

var panel = {    
    img : imgs[24],
    prop : this.img.height / this.img.width, // this != panel here

    h : this.img.height - (scale), // this.img != panel.img
    w : h/prop, // h != panel.h

    x : center.x - (w / 2), // w != panel.w
    y : center.y - (h / 2)  // h != panel.h  
}

panel.draw = function(){    
   g.ctx.drawImage(this.img,
      0, 0,
      this.img.width, this.img.height,
      this.x, this.y,
      this.w, this.h)
}

Should be something like

var Panel = (function() {    
    function Panel(img, scale, center) {  
       this.img = img
       this.prop = img.height / img.width
       this.h = img.height - scale
       this.w = this.h/this.prop
       this.x = center.x - (this.w / 2),
       this.y = center.y - (this.h / 2)
    }
    Panel.prototype.draw = function(ctx) {
          ctx.drawImage(this.img, 0, 0,
          this.img.width, this.img.height,
          this.x, this.y,this.w, this.h)
    }          
})():

var panel = new Panel(imgs[24], scale, center);
panel.draw(g.ctx);
share|improve this answer
    
This could have been a comment, given you don't actually solve the OP's problem. –  Daedalus Oct 3 '12 at 1:11
    
All your comment slashes are the wrong way –  Paul S. Oct 3 '12 at 1:13
    
@shhac Not anymore. –  Daedalus Oct 3 '12 at 1:13

this refers to the context in which panel is declared, not the panel object itself. A few workarounds :

Cache the referred object :

var img = imgs[24];
var panel = {
    img: img
  , height: img.height - scale
  , //...

Create a blank panel object and add properties one by one :

var panel = {};
panel.img = imgs[24]
panel.height = panel.img - scale;

And methods can be declared like any other property.

var panel = {
    img: imgs[24]
  , draw: function(){ g.ctx.drawImage(this.img, 0, 0) }
}
share|improve this answer

Panel object doesn't have panel.img.height property.

var panel = {    
    img :
        { height: // stuff here
        }
    prop : this.img.height / this.img.width,

    h : this.img.height - (scale),
    w : h/prop,

    x : center.x - (w / 2),
    y : center.y - (h / 2)    
}
share|improve this answer

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