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I'm trying to get a handle on Java's error handing. Is it possible to have small try/catch blocks that do one thing and then return the result of it's operation back to the main scope?

It seems like everything has to go inside of the try block, which seems a little odd.

I've set up the following test:

public class test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println(0-10);
        int guess;
        try {
            guess = 5;
        }
        catch(Exception ex) {
            System.out.println("bugger");
        }
        System.out.println(guess);
    }
}

Just for sake of example, I declare a variable, and then assign it a value inside of the try block, but it seems to only exist inside of the try block. Trying to print it outside of the try results in an error. Is there a way to pass information out of the try?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It results in an error because the compiler cannot know whether guess will have been initialized when it tries to print it at the end of the program. What if an exception is thrown inside your try block and guess never gets assigned to anything? You must first assign it to some default value at the start, e.g. int guess = 0.

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Ah, man.. I feel silly for not realizing that. Thanks. –  Zack Oct 3 '12 at 1:33
    
@Zack Happens to the best of us :-) Glad I could help. –  arshajii Oct 3 '12 at 1:36

With your existing code, if you try to access the guess variable outside the try block, compiler would complain by telling you: "guess variable may not be initialized".

Solution : assign the value directly outside the try block like this:

int guess = 5;

but I imagine doing so gets your try/catch useless.

So, depending what you are really expecting in your sample, you can, for instance, simply initialize it to 0.

public class test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println(0-10);
        int guess = 0;
        try {
            guess = 5;
        }
        catch(Exception ex) {
            System.out.println("bugger");
        }
        System.out.println(guess);
    }
}
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A try-catch block, by definition, is not ensured to execute in its entirety. As a result, the compiler doesn't know that guess has been set to 5 for sure, even though it obviously will be. And therefore, because local fields must be initialized before being used, the compiler doesn't know that guess will definitely be assigned a value.

To solve this, you can simply set guess to a default value, so that the compiler knows it has been initialized.

//...
int guess = 0;
try {
    guess = 5;
}
//...
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Conceptually, if manipulating your variable guess may raise an exception due an error, it makes no sense to keep manipulating it after it is caught in the corresponding catch block.

If manipulating guess doesn't trigger any kind of exception, just handle it outside the try block and you will be fine.

The code you presented is ambiguous since if a exception is raised and caught, the program will not have a coherent value.

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