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I'm having a bit of an issue with me code. I'm trying to do a calculation from a drop down menu and then it will onChange to a textbox. I've been at it for days trying to figure it out and Googling ways to code the function. Can anyone please help or give me advice on how to approach this?

function numGuest()
{
    var a = document.getElementById("guests");
    if(a.options[a.selectedIndex].value == "0")
    {
        registration.banq.value = "0";
    }
    else if(a.options[a.selectedIndex].value == "1")
    {
        registration.banq.value = "30";
    }
}
<select id="guests" name="guests">
<option value="0">0</option>
<option value="1">1</option>
<option>2</option>
<option>3</option>
<option>4</option>
<option>5</option>
</select>

<input type="text" id="banq" name="banq" onChange="numGuest()" disabled />
share|improve this question
    
What is registration? What is banq? Do you want the numGuest function to run when the text input's value changes, or when the dropdown's value changes? –  Matt Ball Oct 3 '12 at 2:34
    
registration is the form id and name and banq is the textbox/input id and name. I want the function to run when I select the option from the drop down menu. –  ai5uzu Oct 3 '12 at 2:56

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

registration is not defined. You need to fetch your text input element the same way you did the guests element. Also, the onChange listener should be attached to the select menu not the text area.

<html>
<script>
function numGuest()
{
    var banq = document.getElementById('banq');
    var a = document.getElementById("guests");

    if(a.options[a.selectedIndex].value == "0")
    {
        banq.value = "0";
    }
    else if(a.options[a.selectedIndex].value == "1")
    {
        banq.value = "1";
    }
}
</script>
<select id="guests" name="guests"  onChange="numGuest()" >
    <option value="0">0</option>
    <option value="1">1</option>
    <option>2</option>
    <option>3</option>
    <option>4</option>
    <option>5</option>
</select>

    <input type="text" id="banq" name="banq" disabled />
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
Expecting element ids and names to be global variables is bad practice, it's an IE feature from the very early web that was copied by other browsers for compatability and should be obsoleted. –  RobG Oct 3 '12 at 3:25
    
Thank you so much! I didn't realize I put the onchange on the input instead of the select tag. Thank you for confirming that some of the code was right. There were too many different ways to code this and I was confused. –  ai5uzu Oct 3 '12 at 3:37

Why is the id=banq (textfield) disabled?

To enable: document.getElementById('banq').disabled = false;

For the value of the select:

function numGuest(){
    var theGuestValForCalc = 0;
    var theFinalResult = 0;   

    theGuestValForCalc = document.getElementById('guests').options[document.getElementById('guests').selectedIndex].value;



    theFinalResult = theGuestValForCalc * 10 // or some value, calculation, etc.

    document.getElementById('banq').innerHTML = theFinalResult;

    // return theFinalResult;

}

share|improve this answer
    
It's disabled because the OP wants to display the value of the selected option. Dunno why, since the option is visible and disabled elements aren't successful. Perhaps the OP wants a readonly field instead. –  RobG Oct 3 '12 at 3:42

In your code:

> <input type="text" id="banq" name="banq" onChange="numGuest()" disabled />

That should probably be a readonly field, not disabled.

The onchange listener should be on the select element. Also, you can pass a reference to the element in the listener for convenience:

<select name="guests" onchange="numGuest(this)">

Then in the numGuest function:

function numGuest(element) {

and element will be a reference to the element whose handler called the function.

Since you said your controls are in a form, and form controls with names are made named properties of the form they are in, you can simplify your code:

  var form = element.form;
  var banq = form.banq;
  var a = form.guests; // or element

If the selected option has a value (see notes below), then you can use the value property of the select element directly:

  if (a.value == "0") {
    banq.value = "0";

  } else if (a.value == "1") {
    banq.value = "1";
  }

and you're done.

Notes:

  1. If an option doesn't have a value attribute or property, its value is the text content. Unfortunately older versions of IE don't support that so you have to use select.options[select.selectedIndex].text. But the best idea is to always give options a value, that way you just get the value of the select element.
  2. There is no need to give form controls names and ids. They must have names to be successful, so just give them names and forget the id.
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