Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What's the meaning of them and can I set them in different values?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

From Apple document,we know that the binary Xcode will build is the list Valid Architectures intersected with Architectures.

So ,i don't think Jeremy's answer is right, as he say:

So maybe you only want to build your binary for armv7s, but the same source code would
compile fine for armv7 and armv6. So VALID_ARCHS = armv6 armv7 armv7s, but you set ARCHS = armv7s because that's all you actually want to build with your code.

When you set VALID_ARCHS = armv6 armv7 armv7s,and set ARCHS = armv7s,the result of binary Xcode will build is armv7s,it could not compatible with armv6/armv7.

And if you want to compatible with armv6/armv7/armv7s,you must set VALID_ARCHS = armv6 armv7 armv7s and ARCHS = armv6.In this way , the result of binary Xcode will build is armv6, and it can run fine on both armv6/armv7/armv7s as arm processor is backwards compatible.

share|improve this answer
    
He was right: "because that's all you actually want to build with your code." –  Tuss László Jul 29 '14 at 13:46

Architectures are the ones you want to build, valid architectures are the ones you could conceive of building with your codebase.

So maybe you only want to build your binary for armv7s, but the same source code would compile fine for armv7 and armv6. So VALID_ARCHS = armv6 armv7 armv7s, but you set ARCHS = armv7s because that's all you actually want to build with your code.

Or, in Apple-ese:

ARCHS (Architectures)

Space-separated list of identifiers. Specifies the architectures (ABIs, processor models) to which the binary is targeted. When this build setting specifies more than one architecture, the generated binary may contain object code for each of the specified architectures.

and:

VALID_ARCHS (Valid Architectures)

Space-separated list of identifiers. Specifies the architectures for which the binary may be built. During the build, this list is intersected with the value of ARCHS build setting; the resulting list specifies the architectures the binary can run on. If the resulting architecture list is empty, the target generates no binary.

Source: Xcode Build Setting Reference

In practice, you leave VALID_ARCHS alone and don't worry about changing it, and just fiddle with ARCHS to set the architectures you want to build. Typically, you set a Debug build to just NATIVE_ARCH, since you only want to build the debug version for the machine you'll be testing/running it on, and Release builds for the full spectrum of architectures you plan to support.

share|improve this answer
    
Does anybody know where this "resulting architecture list" can be found????????? –  DanMoore Apr 2 '14 at 19:01
1  
@DanMoore The "resulting architecture list" is done in memory at build time. –  Saltymule Apr 21 '14 at 14:18
2  
@JeremyW.Sherman it seems VALID_ARCHS is useless ? –  onmyway133 Jun 18 '14 at 10:49
3  
@onmyway133 Most of the time, you don't want VALID_ARCHS. If you were writing inline asm for only certain architectures, you might change VALID_ARCHS to reflect that your code is no longer intended for any but those architectures. Mostly, though, it's just a cue to you from Xcode that indicates which architectures it can build for, and you pick from there for your ARCHS. –  Jeremy W. Sherman Jun 18 '14 at 13:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.