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I'm trying to solve the producer-consumer problem ultimately, but I first need to be able to create a critical section using semaphores. The problem I am currently having is when I run the program, the critical section sometimes has multiple processes that will enter it. I'm wanting only one process to be in the critical section at a given time. Here's the code I currently have:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/ipc.h>
#include <sys/sem.h>

#define MAX 20

int main(void)
{
    key_t key = 1114;
    int semid, count,
        mutex = 0;


    //Initialize Semaphore Buffers
    struct sembuf oper0;

    pid_t waitId;
    pid_t parentId = getpid();

    //Create processes
    for(count = 0; count < MAX; count++)
    {
        if((waitId = fork()) == 0)
        {
            break;
        }
    }

    //Create a semaphore set of 3; I will be adding more semaphores
    if ((semid = semget(key, 3, 0600 | IPC_CREAT)) == -1) {
        printf("error in semget");
        exit(1);
    }

    // BINARY/MUTEX - initialize semaphore0 to 1 
    if(semctl(semid, mutex, SETVAL, 1) == -1)
    {
        printf("error in semctl");
        exit(0);
    }

    //Decrement semaphore 0
    oper0.sem_op = -1;
    oper0.sem_flg = 0;
    if (semop(semid, &oper0, 1) == -1) {
        printf("error decrementing semaphore \n");
        exit(1);
    }

    printf(" -- CRITICAL SECTION START ----------- \n\n");
    printf("%5d    %d     %s\n", getpid(), semctl(semid, 0, GETVAL, oper0.sem_num), " -- Semaphore 0");
    printf(" -- CRITICAL SECTION END -- \n\n");    

    //Increments semaphore 0
    oper0.sem_op = 1;
    oper0.sem_flg = 0;
    if (semop(semid, &oper0, 1) == -1) {
        printf("error incrementing semaphore \n");
        exit(1);
    }

    int i;
    if(getpid() == parentId)
    {
        for(i = 0; i < MAX i++)
        {
            wait(&waitId);
        }
    }
    else
    {
        exit(waitId);
    }

    // Remove semaphore 
    if (semctl(semid, 0, IPC_RMID) == -1) {
        printf("error in semctl");
        exit(1);
    }

    return 0;
}

Here's a sample output:

 -- CRITICAL SECTION START ----------- 

 1097    0      -- Semaphore 0
 -- CRITICAL SECTION END -- 

 -- CRITICAL SECTION START ----------- 

 1085    0      -- Semaphore 0
 -- CRITICAL SECTION END -- 

 -- CRITICAL SECTION START ----------- 

 -- CRITICAL SECTION START ----------- 

 1095    0      -- Semaphore 0
 -- CRITICAL SECTION END -- 

 1093    0      -- Semaphore 0
 -- CRITICAL SECTION END -- 

 -- CRITICAL SECTION START ----------- 

 -- CRITICAL SECTION START ----------- 

 1087    0      -- Semaphore 0
 -- CRITICAL SECTION END -- 

 1089    0      -- Semaphore 0
 -- CRITICAL SECTION END -- 

 -- CRITICAL SECTION START ----------- 

 1091    0      -- Semaphore 0
 -- CRITICAL SECTION END -- 

Why is the semaphore locking with one process sometimes, and other times it lets two processes in?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Because you execute semctl(semid, mutex, SETVAL, 1) in every child. You really only want to do that once. If you move the fork loop to after the place where you create and initialize the semaphore, you'll probably find that it looks a lot nicer.

Also, you might want to fflush(stdout) after the printf's; if stdout is buffered, then the output might still end up getting intermingled even though the buffers were written in the critical section.

share|improve this answer
    
That makes perfect sense, thank you! I just have a question to clarify the fflush part. I would only have to put the fflush(stdout) after the printf's inside the critical section, right? And the reason is because the buffer may not print right away and some other part could print before it? –  Brad Germain Oct 3 '12 at 4:32
    
If the point of the critical section is to serialize stdout, then you should flush just before you leave a critical section, and never print anything outside of a critical section, which is equivalent to the invariant that buffers are always empty when you're not in a critical section. (Console output is line-buffered, but not if you redirect to a file.) –  rici Oct 3 '12 at 4:43
    
Oh, ok. Thanks again! –  Brad Germain Oct 3 '12 at 4:57

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