Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Just like the title asks, can C++ class templates take method names as template parameters?

For instance,

template <T>
class Foo
{
public:
    void T(int bar);
};
share|improve this question
    
No.<fillerfiller> – Jerry Coffin Oct 3 '12 at 3:47
    
I really can't think of where this would ever be useful. Do you have a specific problem, or is this just hypothetical? – chris Oct 3 '12 at 3:48
    
@chris - Not saying it ever would be. It was just a question that came across my mind. – Qix Oct 3 '12 at 3:48
3  
If you're doing what I think you're doing, you may find info on functors useful. (and no, you can't do this, but a text file + c++ compiler could have told you that). – WhozCraig Oct 3 '12 at 3:48
1  
@Di-0xide It wouldn't take tons of of compilers; only one that follows that standard. And the functionality was included in several ways, just not this way. – WhozCraig Oct 3 '12 at 3:54
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Unfortunately, the C++ core language does not have any means of handling names.

Some possibilities:

  • Handle names via the preprocessor, ie., ugly macros.
    Note: the Boost parameters library uses some undocumented Boost macro trickery that is very relevant here. I used that for a general options class thing once. Sorry I can't remember much about it, but essentially it supports a kind of variadic macros for C++03.
  • Do your own custom preprocessing, i.e. script based.
  • Put the burden on the client code programmer, somehow.

For those who wonder, what does one need this for?, a case in point is how to something like Python's library "named tuple" class, in C++, where the programmer provides the names of the tuple members.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.