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I'm struggling with this. I've got it to display most of the list, but one of the 1's is not showing up, and I can't for the life of me figure out how to fix it.

Here is the relevant code, I think.

My insert function:

 template <class T>
 void DoublyLinkedList<T>::insert(T data)
 {
    DoublyLinkedList<T> *newNode, *tmp, *oneBefore;

    newNode = new DoublyLinkedList(data);

if (mNext == NULL)
    mNext = newNode;

else
{
   oneBefore = mNext;
   tmp = mNext;

    while (tmp != NULL && tmp->mData < data)
    {
        oneBefore = tmp;
        tmp = tmp->mNext;
    }

    if (tmp == mNext)
    {
        newNode->mNext = mNext;
        mNext = newNode;
    }
    else
    {
        oneBefore->mNext = newNode;
        newNode->mNext = tmp;
        newNode->mPrevious = oneBefore;
    }

   }
 }

My displayBackwards function:

 void displayBackward(DoublyLinkedList<int> *ptr)
 {
    DoublyLinkedList<int> *tmp;

    tmp = ptr;
    while (tmp != NULL)
    {
       cout << tmp->getData() << endl;
       tmp = tmp->getPrevious();
    }
 }

And the relevant part of my main function:

    DoublyLinkedList<int> *ptr, *head, *tail;

    ptr = new DoublyLinkedList<int>;

    cout << "Testing Insert\n";
    ptr->insert(1);
    ptr->insert(2);
    ptr->insert(3);
    ptr->insert(1);

    tail = ptr;
    while (tail->getNext() != NULL)
       tail = tail->getNext();

    cout << "\n\nTesting displayBackward\n";
    displayBackward(tail);

My output currently is:

 Testing displayBackward
 3
 2
 1
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closed as too localized by Joachim Pileborg, Eitan T, HaskellElephant, Sergey K., Fabio Oct 3 '12 at 9:36

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
@Mark: It's a free-floating C-style doubly linked list, not a C++ std::list like one within a bound container. –  Xeo Oct 3 '12 at 4:10
    
Yes, I believe so, why? –  nym_kalahi Oct 3 '12 at 4:11
    
@Xeo and user1698667, sorry - my comment was based on the title of the question, not the actual question itself. I withdraw it and apologize for the snark. P.S. You might try to change the title to be more representative of the question. –  Mark Ransom Oct 3 '12 at 4:12
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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This code is the problem (in the insert function)

    if (tmp == mNext)
    {
        newNode->mNext = mNext;
        mNext = newNode;
    }

You need

    if (tmp == mNext)
    {
        newNode->mNext = mNext;
        mNext->mPrevious = newNode;
        mNext = newNode;
    }

Your original code will work in cases except when you try to insert data which is less than or equal to the data in your current first node.

Also, I am assuming you constructor initializes mNext & mPrevious to NULL. If not, you will have other problems.

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 template <class T>
 void DoublyLinkedList<T>::insert(T data)
 {
    DoublyLinkedList<T> *newNode, *tmp, *oneBefore;

    newNode = new DoublyLinkedList(data);

if (mNext == NULL)
    mNext = newNode;

else

This isn't linking up the new node's back pointer.

There may be more wrong with your code also.


An easy way to code up a doubly linked list is to

  • differentiate between list and node type, and
  • make each list always have one dummy node, called a header node.

That way you will have no NULL pointers to deal with.

It really simplifies things.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you explain to me how I could fix that issue? I know its a problem with the insert function. –  nym_kalahi Oct 3 '12 at 4:13
    
@user1698667: fixing "isn't linking up" involves linking up. You don't show any type definition so it's impossible to know what you've called the back pointer member. I think it could be a good idea to study the concept of a doubly linked list, because apparently you're treating it as just a singly linked list. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Oct 3 '12 at 4:15
    
The back pointer member is called "mPrevious", it's there in my insert function... I understand the concept of the doubly linked list, but I'm struggling with the implementation. –  nym_kalahi Oct 3 '12 at 4:19
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