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I have an application that does a large number of searches by querying remote APIs. The results are pulled into my data tier (SQL Server) where they sit to see if the user would like to further interact with them. Once the user starts working with that item, it's essential that it stays in the system, but the rest of the results are entirely useless and just taking up space.

I was thinking about making a task that would run a sproc to delete any rows that are NOT referenced by another table. Is there a way to do that?

Another way of wording it would be: Is there a way to execute a delete statement that would skip rows that would cause an error due to a violation of referential integrity?

EDIT: Thanks to new info from @Kos... The alternate path I'm considering is to add a bit column to the table and mark it true if the row ends up being used and just having my task delete rows marked false.

For clarity, here is an overview of the situation. The syntax might not be perfect on these, but hopefully you get the idea:

-- Where all the results get pulled down and held (The table I want to clean up every 2 hours or so)
CREATE TABLE [reservations].[DumpTable](
    [utypeID] [bigint] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL
    -- Other columns
    CONSTRAINT [PK_UnitTypesFound] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED 
    (
        [utypeID] ASC
    )WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON) ON [PRIMARY]
) ON [PRIMARY]


-- This is one of many other tables that might reference the dump table
CREATE TABLE [reservations].[OtherTables](
    [memberID]  INT NOT NULL,
    [utypeID]   BIGINT NOT NULL -- Need to Know if the dumptable is referenced here
    CONSTRAINT [PK_MemberUnitTypes] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED
    (
        [memberID],
        [utypeID]
    ) WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF,     ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON) ON [PRIMARY]
) ON [PRIMARY]

ALTER TABLE [reservations].[OtherTables]  WITH CHECK ADD  CONSTRAINT [FK_OtherTable_DumpTable] FOREIGN KEY([utypeID])
    REFERENCES [reservations].[DumpTable] ([utypeID])

ALTER TABLE [reservations].[OtherTables] CHECK CONSTRAINT [FK_OtherTable_DumpTable]
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1  
About the alternate path: You could just drop a 0/1 column that would indicate if a record is used. That little amount of redundancy would probably make the pruning quicker –  Kos Oct 3 '12 at 4:32
    
That's a great idea. I will definitely do that if there isn't another way. –  Lawrence Johnson Oct 3 '12 at 4:35
    
BTW if there's a lot of tables that refer to your table via foreign keys, you might want to rely on the foreign key constraint to prevent the deletion (ON DELETE RESTRICT or ON DELETE NO ACTION). But that's just a tip, I'm a bit short on time atm to make a complete answer on that. –  Kos Oct 3 '12 at 4:45
    
Yes, I have the foreign keys preventing it, but I want to be able to run the query without it blowing up from trying to do something that would break the constraint. –  Lawrence Johnson Oct 3 '12 at 4:47
    
In other words: skip the rows that would cause an error due to referential integrity. –  Lawrence Johnson Oct 3 '12 at 4:56

4 Answers 4

You can also use this Query, Using join instead of where clause speeds query up.

DELETE FROM DATA_TABLE 
FROM         DATA_TABLE LEFT OUTER JOIN
                      OTHERON DATA_TABLE.OTHER_TABLE_ID= OTHER.ID 
WHERE     (OTHER.ID IS NULL) and DATA_TABLE.SOME_TIMESTAMP < threshold_time
share|improve this answer
    
Are you sure that this speeds the query up?? Left outer joins can be quite slow. Ideally, the database produces the same execution plan anyway and it doesn't matter (performance wise). –  Stefan Steinegger Oct 3 '12 at 6:26
    
This is a lot like the first answer, but I do appreciate the alternative option on syntax. –  Lawrence Johnson Oct 3 '12 at 6:30
    
@StefanSteinegger I also wonder how it compares to putting the select statement in at_sceaj's answer into a scalar function. Thoughts? –  Lawrence Johnson Oct 3 '12 at 6:32
    
I had a database which in was two table with about 6 or 7 column and about 100000 record , i compared these two query on them and it seems that "outer join" one runs faster than the "two nested select".though I didn't check the Execution Plan. –  Maryam Arshi Oct 3 '12 at 6:54
1  
Ok , I tested my solution on a database with about two million record, my query performance was absolutely different from the other one, mine takes about 5 msecond but the other one takes about 1 minute and half. of course how the indexing is done is really important in times of running these two query. –  Maryam Arshi Oct 3 '12 at 13:27

Your question is a little sparse on details, but assuming that the tables look something like:

DATA_TABLE
    OTHER_TABLE_ID    INTEGER
    SOME_TIMESTAMP    DATETIME

OTHER_TABLE
    ID                INTEGER

then a basic delete like:

DELETE FROM DATA_TABLE dt WHERE dt.SOME_TIMESTAMP < threshold_time
  AND NOT EXISTS (SELECT 1 FROM OTHER TABLE WHERE ID = dt.OTHER_TABLE_ID;

should do the trick. I'm assuming that you need to give the users some amount of time to decide to work with a given row in DATA_TABLE.

Update: If the OTHER_TABLE isn't a specific table, but could be any of several tables, your best bet is probably a flag in DATA_TABLE that indicates that the row is being referenced "somewhere" in the database. The downside I see to this approach is it gets harder to maintain the flag if references can go away at a later time.

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Yes, that's correct about the time threshold. Is there a way to perform this check without knowing the other tables its referenced by? Its a huge database (about 97 tables or so) and even though it won't be referenced by more than two (maybe three), I'm just curious if there is a way to do so. Thank you! –  Lawrence Johnson Oct 3 '12 at 4:38
    
Oh, and no that isn't exactly what I mean, I'll elaborate on the schema and update OP. –  Lawrence Johnson Oct 3 '12 at 4:40
    
Thanks for the update. @Kos left me that tip in the OP comments. In my situation, one a reference is establish it will never go away, and it's starting to sound like that is going to be the best solution. –  Lawrence Johnson Oct 3 '12 at 4:56

Check this link. This would help you in getting all the Foreign Key Relationships in your database. The script given there has the provision to filter only the tables you need.
Once you have the list you can dump it into a temp table. The table would have table names and the column names which have FK relationship between them. Then you will have to loop through each record of this table and by using dynamic query ( because table and column names will be present in rows) you will have to find the records in Dump table which are in FK relationship and dump into another temp table. Finally delete all the records from your Dump table which do NOT EXIST in this temp table.
Give it a shot. Hope it helps!!

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My understanding (well OK this is dating back to SQL Server 2000) is that dynamic queries built in TSQL have major performance problems. Is that not true? –  Lawrence Johnson Oct 3 '12 at 6:25
    
Using dynamic sql gets the sp compiled every time its called. So ofcourse using dynamic SQL is not a great solution but there are situations where dynamic SQL is the best or only way to go. I can not think of any other efficient and flexible solution to your problem but there are some great minds on Stack Overflow, may be some one else can give you a better solution. –  Luftwaffe Oct 3 '12 at 9:12
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I ended up going with a solution similar to what was recommended in the comments of the OP by @Kos. It came somewhat naturally because I realized that the nature of this table would need at least one foreign key referencing another table if interacted with by a user, so similar to the BIT column, I'm simply running a statement like this:

DELETE FROM [table] WHERE ISNULL([colForeignKey], 0) = 0

For others visiting, I recommend looking at the answer from @Maryam because I think that most people who land on this page, that will be the best solution (at least that has been given up to the time of this posting).

Thanks all for your help

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