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I'm trying to plot the following implicit formula in R:

1 = x^2 + 4*(y^2) + x*y

which should be an ellipse. I'd like to randomly sample the x values and then generate the graph based on those.

Here's a related thread, but the solutions there seem to be specific to the 3D case. This question has been more resistant to Googling that I would have expected, so maybe the R language calls implicit formulas something else.

Thanks in advance!

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@mnel. Your version was correct. Undelete! –  BondedDust Oct 3 '12 at 5:39

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Two things you may not understand. When plotting implicit functions with that technique, you need to move all terms to the RHS of the function so that your implicit function becomes:

0 = -1+ x^2 + 4*(y^2) + x*y

Then using the contour value of zero will make sense:

x<-seq(-1.1,1.1,length=1000)
y<-seq(-1,1,length=1000)
z<-outer(x,y,function(x,y) 4*y^2+x^2+x*y -1 )
contour(x,y,z,levels=0)

I got a sign wrong on the first version. @mnels' was correct.

enter image description here

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Yeah, but what about his request to "randomly sample x" ? I wonder whether he wants to use your method but using x<-runif(1000,-1.1,1.1) and solving for y to generate points on the ellipse. Alternatively, how about sfsmisc::ellipsePoints ? –  Carl Witthoft Oct 3 '12 at 11:24
    
To be honest I didn't notice the "random" x part of the question. "Solving for y" would require getting both "sides" of the quadratic. sfmisc::ellipsePoints doesn't appear to offer an immediate (or even a delayed) solution for me. I would need to go back and calculate the lengths of the half axes, the center, and the angle before having its aparameters and even then I see no way to use it to generate a solution for an arbitrary x value. –  BondedDust Oct 3 '12 at 16:18

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