Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I've been playing around with the map function in Python and I was looking for some help in understanding the following behaviour:

foo="12345"
print map(int,foo)

gives you [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]. Obviously int(foo) spits out 12345. So what exactly is happening? Since strings are iterable by character, would the above two lines be synonymous with

print [int(x) for x in foo]

I know they will output the same result but is there anything different going on behind the scenes? Is one more efficient or better than another? Is one more "pythonic"?

Thanks a lot!

share|improve this question
1  
3  
This falls in the realm of opinion. Opinion: They are functionally similar and it is somewhat user preference. map clock a bit faster; List comprehension is more immediately obvious to third party eyes. –  the wolf Oct 3 '12 at 5:46

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

map() may be somewhat faster than using list comprehension in some cases and in some cases map is slower than list comprehensions.

when using a built-in function:

python -mtimeit -s'xs=xrange(1000)' 'map(int,"1234567890")'
10000 loops, best of 3: 18.3 usec per loop

python -mtimeit -s'xs=xrange(1000)' '[int(x) for x in "1234567890"]'
100000 loops, best of 3: 20 usec per loop

with lambda,map() becomes slow:

python -mtimeit -s'xs=xrange(1000)' '[x*10 for x in "1234567890"]'
100000 loops, best of 3: 6.11 usec per loop

python -mtimeit -s'xs=xrange(1000)' 'map(lambda x:x*10,"1234567890")'
100000 loops, best of 3: 11.2 usec per loop

But, in python 3x map() returns a map object, i.e. an iterator

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 Could not give more than that.. :) –  Rohit Jain Oct 3 '12 at 5:55
1  
what is xs for? –  John La Rooy Oct 3 '12 at 6:21

Apply function to every item of iterable and return a list of the results.

From the documentation for map

int() attempts to convert what is passed into an integer and will raise a ValueError if you try something silly, like this:

>>> int('Hello')
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
ValueError: invalid literal for int() with base 10: 'Hello'

map() will return a list, which has the return value of the function that you ask it to call for any iterable. If your function returns nothing, then you'll get a list of Nones, like this:

>>> def silly(x):
...   pass
...
>>> map(silly,'Hello')
[None, None, None, None, None]

It is the short and efficient way to do something like this:

   def verbose_map(some_function,something):
       results = []
       for i in something:
          results.append(some_function(i))
       return results
share|improve this answer

map can be thought of to work like this:

def map(func, iterable):
    answer = []
    for elem in iterable:
        answer.append(func(elem))
    return answer

Basically, it returns a list L such that the ith element of L is the result of computing func on the ith element of your iterable.

So, with int and a string of ints, in each iteration of the for loop, the element is a specific character, which when given to int comes back as an actual int. The result of calling map on such a string is a list, whose elements correspond to the inted values of the corresponding character in the string.

So yes, if L = "12345", then map(int, L) is synonymous with [int(x) for x in L]

Hope this helps

share|improve this answer
foo="12345"

In [507]: dis.dis('map(int,foo)')
          0 <109>           28769
          3 STORE_SLICE+0  
          4 LOAD_ATTR       29806 (29806)
          7 <44>           
          8 BUILD_TUPLE     28527
         11 STORE_SLICE+1  

def map(func, iterable):
    answer = []
    for elem in iterable:
        answer.append(func(elem))
    return answer

dis.dis('map(int,foo)')
          0 <109>           28769
          3 STORE_SLICE+0  
          4 LOAD_ATTR       29806 (29806)
          7 <44>           
          8 BUILD_TUPLE     28527
         11 STORE_SLICE+1  
dis.dis('[int(x) for x in foo]')
          0 DELETE_NAME     28265 (28265)
          3 LOAD_GLOBAL     30760 (30760)
          6 STORE_SLICE+1  
          7 SLICE+2        
          8 BUILD_TUPLE     29295
         11 SLICE+2        
         12 SETUP_LOOP      26912 (to 26927)
         15 JUMP_FORWARD    26144 (to 26162)
         18 JUMP_IF_FALSE   23919 (to 23940)

And timing:

In [512]: timeit map(int,foo)
100000 loops, best of 3: 6.89 us per loop

In [513]: def mymap(func, iterable):
     ...:     answer = []
     ...:     for elem in iterable:
     ...:         answer.append(func(elem))
     ...:     return answer

In [514]: timeit mymap(int,foo)
100000 loops, best of 3: 8.29 us per loop

In [515]: timeit [int(x) for x in foo]
100000 loops, best of 3: 7.5 us per loop
share|improve this answer

"More efficient" is a can of worms. On this computer, it's faster to use map with CPython, but the list comprehension is faster for pypy

$ python -mtimeit 'map(int,"1234567890")'
100000 loops, best of 3: 8.05 usec per loop
$ python -mtimeit '[int(x) for x in "1234567890"]'
100000 loops, best of 3: 9.33 usec per loop
$ pypy -mtimeit 'map(int,"1234567890")'
1000000 loops, best of 3: 1.18 usec per loop
$ pypy -mtimeit '[int(x) for x in "1234567890"]'
1000000 loops, best of 3: 0.938 usec per loop

Python3 shows map() to be faster even with the extra call to list() that is required

$ python3 -mtimeit 'list(map(int,"1234567890"))'
100000 loops, best of 3: 11.8 usec per loop
$ python3 -mtimeit  '[int(x) for x in "1234567890"]'
100000 loops, best of 3: 13.6 usec per loop
share|improve this answer

Yes, there is a huge difference behind the scenes. If you print(map) you'll see it is a builtin. A builtin function executes faster than one written in python or than most that are based off of how the language is parsed, map uses the fast iter method, a list comprehension does not. Other that there is no difference.

map(int, '1'*1000000)

vs.

[int(i) for i in '1'*1000000]

Using CPython, and the unix time program, map completes in ~3 seconds, the list comprehension in ~5.

Oh, one thing to note, this only pertains when the function passed to map is written in C.

share|improve this answer
    
Umm, what is a syntactic function? int and map are both built ins. –  Burhan Khalid Oct 3 '12 at 5:43
    
I was refering to the list comprehension, map calls int repeatedly, so that one exists in both cases, the difference is that the iterable passed to map is passed with the cpython fast loop function, while the other one is parsed by a slower approach. –  Perkins Oct 3 '12 at 5:46
    
Iterating over a string of length 10e7 with [int(i) for i in s] takes ~5 seconds on my machine, map(int, s) takes 3. –  Perkins Oct 3 '12 at 5:50
    
You should clarify your answer then. –  Burhan Khalid Oct 3 '12 at 5:54
    
Of course, is that better? I'm trying to figure out how to explain it better, preferably without dredging around through the C source code. –  Perkins Oct 3 '12 at 5:56

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.