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My question concerns modern browser optimization through function inlining. I think I really need someone who is familiar with the V8, JavaScriptCore, and/or SpiderMonkey codebase to answer this question; or at least someone knowledgeable in modern browser approaches to optimization.

Basically I want to know if there's any way to predict when function inlining will be used and how to leverage it for optimizing performance with minimal code duplication.

Let's take the following simple function from joi tempo as an example:

function limit(f, max) {
    var count = 0, isFunction = typeof max == 'function';
    if(!isFunction) max = max >>> 0 || 1;
    return function limitedFunction() {
        if(isFunction ? !max(count) : (count >= max)) return;
        count++;
        return f.apply(this, arguments);
    };
}

This function takes a function f and returns a wrapper function which limits the number of times the original function can be called through the wrapper. Example:

var foo = limit(function() { console.log('foo'); }, 3);
foo(); // logs 'foo'
foo(); // logs 'foo'
foo(); // logs 'foo'
foo(); // doesn't log anything
foo(); // doesn't log anything

It also accepts a function which returns true or false as its second argument (instead of a number):

var bar = limit(
    function() { console.log('bar'); },
    function() { return Math.random() > 0.5 ? true : false }
);
bar(); // randomly logs 'bar' or doesn't log anything
bar(); // randomly logs 'bar' or doesn't log anything
bar(); // randomly logs 'bar' or doesn't log anything

This is an overly simplistic, trivial example, so bear with me. I think there are real applications for this in non-trivial cases, but I want to use an easy case to get to the root of how the browser does or can do inlining.

One way to rewrite this function which could (probably) be (very slightly) improved for performance (I imagine) would be to separate the returned function into two cases, one where max is a function and the other where max is a number:

function limit(f, max) {
    var count = 0, isFunction = typeof max == 'function';
    if(!isFunction) max = max >>> 0 || 1;
    return isFunction
        ? function limitedFunctionA() {
            if(!max(count)) return;
            count++;
            return f.apply(this, arguments);
        }
        : function limitedFunctionB() {
            if(count >= max) return;
            count++;
            return f.apply(this, arguments);
        };
}

This way the check to see if isFunction is true or false doesn't have to occur every time limitedFunction is called but only once when it is determined whether to return limitedFunctionA or limitedFunctionB. However, this is not ideal because there is some redundant code.

My question concerns the following rewrite:

function limit(f, max) {
    var count = 0, isFunction = typeof max == 'function',
        check = isFunction
            ? function() { return !max(count); }
            : function() { return count >= max; };
    if(!isFunction) max = max >>> 0 || 1;
    return function limitedFunction() {
        if(check()) return;
        count++;
        return f.apply(this, arguments);
    };
}

So here's my question... Will modern browsers be smart enough to turn

if(check()) return;

into

if(!max(count)) return;

when isFunction is true, and

if(count >= max) return;

when isFunction is false? ... preventing the need to call the extra check() function, throwing an extra function onto the stack unnecessarily each time.

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closed as off topic by John3136, Basile Starynkevitch, AVD, Eitan T, Jim Garrison Oct 3 '12 at 8:02

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2  
The answer might be eventually yes, (in particular when your limit function has been run many times), because modern browsers Javascript implementations usually do en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tracing_just-in-time_compilation –  Basile Starynkevitch Oct 3 '12 at 5:45
    
I think in your third code you can write check = max if isFunction is true, and calling check(count) instead? –  Alvin Wong Oct 3 '12 at 5:50
    
@Alvin The max function needs to be negated. The other function could be rewritten to return count < max and then check for if(!check(count)) of course. But that's all beside the point, I think. This question's about browser optimizations for function inlining :) –  Nathan Wall Oct 3 '12 at 5:54
    
@Basile, thanks for the Wikipedia article. Fascinating reading. –  Nathan Wall Oct 3 '12 at 5:59
2  
This is a pretty heavy topic, but seriously, it's easier for the engine to optimize if you don't try to outsmart it. If you always pass the same value-type to a function, and you inline arrays, and don't mix values kept inside arrays (that also means using 31-bit signed ints instead of floats), and don't add or remove properties from objects which aren't defined in the constructor (if you're going to template construction of objects -- an inline object will matter naught). These are places where big wins can be had in optimization without trying to outsmart the machine doing the work. –  Norguard Oct 3 '12 at 6:38