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There are about 100 files and I need to go through each of them and delete all the data which is between <style> and </style> + delete these tags too.

For example

<html>
<head> <title> Example </title> </head>
<style>
p{color: red;
background-color: #FFFF;
}
div {......
...
}
</style>
<body>
<p> hi I'm a paragraph. </p>
</body>
</html>

should become

<html>
<head> <title> Example </title> </head>
<body>
<p> hi I'm a paragraph. </p>
</body>
</html>

Also, in some files the style pattern is like

<style type="text/css"> blah </style>

or

<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="$url_path/gridsorting.css">

I need to remove all 3 patterns. How do I do this in Perl?

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It looks like you're seeking to process HTML with regular expressions. That's an astonishingly bad idea! –  Donal Fellows Oct 3 '12 at 10:31
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6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted
use strict;
use warnings;

use XML::LibXML qw( );

my $qfn = 'a.html';

my $doc  = XML::LibXML->load_html( location => $qfn );
my $root = $doc->documentElement();

for my $style_node ($root->findnodes('//style')) {
   $style_node->parentNode()->removeChild($style_node);
}

{
   open(my $fh, '>', $qfn)
      or die;
   print($fh $doc->toStringHTML());
}

It correctly handles:

  • style elements with attributes or spaces in the tag,
  • style elements that span more than one line,
  • style tags that span more than one line,
  • lines that contain part of a style element and something else,
  • documents with multiple style elements,
  • something that looks like a style tags in attribute values,
  • something that looks like a style tags in CDATA blocks, and
  • something that looks like a style tags in comments.

As of this update, the other solutions only handle 2 or 3 of these.

share|improve this answer
    
The output is this: pastebin.com/uWAamD19. It added DOCTYPE and <head></head> which I don't need. –  Chankey Pathak Oct 3 '12 at 6:41
    
How can I remove the DOCTYPE and <head></head>? I don't know why it's generating automatically. –  Chankey Pathak Oct 3 '12 at 7:09
    
You can't. That's what it does. There's no reason to remove them. –  ikegami Oct 3 '12 at 14:29
1  
@fxzuz, Your change is not equivalent. I do not want to import anything! Omitting parens around arguments leads to numerous problems, and makes it harder to see where the argument lists ends. Reverting your changes. –  ikegami Oct 3 '12 at 14:31
    
@fxzuz, Why did you only remove those parens? There were numerous others you could have removed. You weren't even consistent with yourself! –  ikegami Oct 3 '12 at 14:33
show 2 more comments

One way using sed:

sed '/<style>/,/<\/style>/d' file.txt

Results:

<html>
<head> <title> Example </title> </head>
<body>
<p> hi I'm a paragraph. </p>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
Nice, good to know the solution in sed. –  Chankey Pathak Oct 3 '12 at 6:33
    
That assumes there's never anything but style elements on one line. That assumes <style>...</style> doesn't appears in attributes values, CDATA and comments. etc –  ikegami Oct 3 '12 at 14:40
1  
@ikegami: You are correct. I made some assumptions about the input. An XML parser should be used +1 –  Steve Oct 3 '12 at 22:27
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perl -lne 'print unless(/<style>/.../<\/style>/)' your_file

tested below:

> cat temp
<html>
<head> <title> Example </title> </head>
<style>
p{color: red;
background-color: #FFFF;
}
div {......
...
}
</style>
<body>
<p> hi I'm a paragraph. </p>
</body>
</html>


> perl -lne 'print unless(/<style>/.../<\/style>/)' temp
<html>
<head> <title> Example </title> </head>
<body>
<p> hi I'm a paragraph. </p>
</body>
</html>
> 

if you want to do it inplace,then:

perl -i -lne 'print unless(/<style>/.../<\/style>/)' your_file
share|improve this answer
    
That assumes there's never anything but style elements on one line. That assumes the style elements have no attributes. That assumes <style>...</style> doesn't appears in attributes values, CDATA and comments. etc –  ikegami Oct 3 '12 at 14:42
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Ikegami is right, you really should use at least an HTML/XML parser to do this task. Personally I like using the Mojo::DOM parser. This is a Document-Object Model interface to your HTML and it supports CSS3 selectors, making it really flexible when you need it. This is a pretty easy one for it however:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use Mojo::DOM;

my $content = <<'END';
<html>
<head> <title> Example </title> </head>
<style>
p{color: red;
background-color: #FFFF;
}
div {......
...
}
</style>
<body>
<p> hi I'm a paragraph. </p>
</body>
</html>
END

my $dom = Mojo::DOM->new( $content );
$dom->find('style')->pluck('remove');

print $dom;

The pluck method is a little confusing, but its really just a shorthand for the doing a method on each resultant object. The analogous line could be

$dom->find('style')->each(sub{ $_->remove });

which is a little more understandable but less cute.


After reading your edit that you have to deal with more that just your basic form, I have to stress even further that this is why you use a parser for modifying HTML rather than let your regex grow to ridiculous proportions.

Now lets say that the $content variable also contained these lines

<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="$url_path/gridsorting.css">
<link rel="icon" href="somefile.jpg">

where you want to remove the first one, and not the second. You can do this in one of two ways.

$dom->find('link')->each( sub{ $_->remove if $_->{rel} eq 'stylesheet' } );

This mechanism uses the object methods (and Mojo::DOM exposes attributes as hash keys) to remove only the link tags which have rel=stylesheet. You can however use CSS3 selectors to only find those elements, however, and since Mojo::DOM has full CSS3 selector support you can do

$dom->find('link[rel=stylesheet]')->pluck('remove'); 

CSS3 selector statements can be joined with a comma to find all tags matching either selector, so we can simply include the line

$dom->find('style, link[rel=stylesheet]')->pluck('remove');

and get rid of all your offensive stylesheets in one fell swoop!

share|improve this answer
    
Can you tell that I'm proctoring an exam and have nothing better to do but consider CSS3 selectors. :-) –  Joel Berger Oct 3 '12 at 22:43
    
Sadly I have to use Perl 5.8 :/ –  Chankey Pathak Oct 4 '12 at 5:45
    
see perlbrew –  Joel Berger Oct 4 '12 at 8:09
1  
While I can imagine that a company has strong policy for using a specific version of Perl for live shared programs (think webapps or db interaction), what you are doing is a one-off admin task. If they are preventing you from using the right tool for the job, they are preventing you from doing your job. –  Joel Berger Oct 5 '12 at 12:00
1  
I did it somehow, but yes I had to write a shit code for that. I feel bad :| anyways, thanks for the answer, it will help me in future (perhaps). cheers! :) –  Chankey Pathak Oct 6 '12 at 13:03
show 1 more comment

One more possible solution is to use HTML::TreeBuilder.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use HTML::TreeBuilder 5; # Ensure weak references in use

foreach my $file_name (@ARGV) {
  my $tree = HTML::TreeBuilder->new; # empty tree
  $tree->parse_file($file_name);
  # print "Hey, here's a dump of the parse tree of $file_name:\n";
  # $tree->dump; # a method we inherit from HTML::Element
  foreach my $e ($tree->look_down(_tag => "style")) {
      $e->delete();
  }
  foreach my $e ($tree->look_down(_tag => "link", rel => "stylesheet")) {
      $e->delete();
  }
  print "And here it is, bizarrely rerendered as HTML:\n",
    $tree->as_HTML, "\n";

  # Now that we're done with it, we must destroy it.
  $tree = $tree->delete; # Not required with weak references
}
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I figured out one way, you can try the following:

#! /usr/bin/perl -w
use strict;
my $line = << 'END';
<html>
<head> <title> Example </title> </head>
<style>
p{color: red;
background-color: #FFFF;
}
div {......
...
}
</style>
<body>
<p> hi I'm a paragraph. </p>
</body>
</html>
END

$line =~ s{<style[^>]*.*?</style>.}{}gs;
print $line;
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