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I have a few questions about code design. This might be long. I'll shorten it whereever possible.

Q1) Dependant or Independant?

Creating a class and adding required functionality so as to allow the object to change its own state vs state being changed by a controller (aka viewcontroller)

I find code examples are best when trying to communicate: Note: I reduced some lines of code. Original code from http://www.techotopia.com/index.php/An_Overview_of_Objective-C_Object_Oriented_Programming.

Anyways if I had to set the Account balance for an account it is suggesting I do this:

@interface BankAccount: NSObject
{
    double accountBalance;
    long accountNumber;
}
-(double) getAccountBalance;
-(void) setAccountBalance: (double) x;
@end

// Implementation Section Starts Here

@implementation BankAccount

-(void) setAccountBalance: (double) x
{
    accountBalance = x;
}

-(double) getAccountBalance
{
    return accountBalance;
}
@end

//usage
    BankAccount *account1 = [BankAccount alloc] init];

    [account1 setAccountBalance: 1500.53];

----HOWEVER I believe I would have wrote it in a controller like this:------

@interface BankAccount: NSObject
{
    double accountBalance;
    long accountNumber;
}

import "BankAccount.h"
@interface MeViewController : UIViewController 
-(void)setAccountBalance:(double)x toAccount:(BankAccount *)tempBankAcc;
@end

@implementation myViewController

-(void) setAccountBalance:(double)x toAccount:(BankAccount *)tempBankAcc
{
    tempBankAcc.accountBalance = x;
}

//USAGE
BankAccount *account1 = [BankAccount alloc] init];

[self setAccountBalance(Account1,1500.53)]

@end

because I believe it is Me (meViewController) setting the AccountBalance, not the account itself as an account is just an account. Is this a very bad idea? I can see with their example that the object can look after itself (independent) meaning changing its own state whereas my approach says that the BankAccount can only be modified through/with the controller (dependant) ???

Q2) What should/should not be in a controller?

I have also read somewhere that code written inside the controller should be only for:

Responding to user interaction & Updating the views

so does this means I should never do the following in the controllers:

READ or WRITE to and from NSUserDefaults. Since its a singleton, I thought it would be easier to write to it regardless of which controller is currently active? bad idea? I understand that I should save data (includes NSUserDefaults) in applicationDidEnterBackground and in applicationWillTerminate so does that its a bad idea to save elsewhere (eg. in another controller).

Q3) Which design patterns do you most commonly use and which ones do you abuse wrongly?

Singletons: My understanding is that [UIApplication sharedApplication],[NSNotification defaultCenter] and other singletons are accessible via all controllers, how about NSObject subclasses? or UIView subclasses?

And apparently you can use NSNotification to notify other controllers when the model has been updated. Can someone tell me an example of when to use and how to use that? Maybe when you import some data, that has different attributes, than was originally intended, then the observers could be notified of an upgraded data model, is that an example of when you would within your data model notify a controller?

Thats enough questions for now.

Sorry but I had to get them all out of my head:-)

Ben

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1  
Perhaps use: NSDecimalNumber *balance; –  neoneye Oct 3 '12 at 6:44

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Q1 If you take away all the business logic from the object itself, it's nothing more than a shallow container object. Further more, you need to replicate that logic in every controller you use. Business logic goes into business objects.

To your concrete example, the method of the controller does nothing but delegates the call down to the very object itself (infact, calling the same method if you use properties here). So you gained nothing at all. It may be fine to have that method in the controller, if the controller does more than just calling down on the object, maybe update some more data. One of the good hints here is that the controller does not use any of its own instance variables. It could easily be a class method. It's a code smell.

Q2 Basically, you have three choices for accessing NSUserDefaults: application level, view controller level, or view level.

Worst case is view level - a view should work in any context and should be configurable any way you like, and it certainly should not depend on some magic outside things. This would make reusability (not only for other apps, but also within the same app) a pain.

Accessing the defaults on the view controller level is often ok, especially if they take some singleton role. I.e. if you only ever have one playing screen and one setting screen, each of them might easily talk to the defaults. If there's the chance that you may have several instances of the same class differently configured, this gets a pain and bad smelling work arounds to "individualize" those.

This is where you want to place the access of the defaults outside of the view controllers, which is the most elegant and flexible approcach, but sometimes just not necessary.

Reusability may come earlier than expected, i.e. opening up a second text editor window (which might or might not show a different font), a second settings screen (i.e. a popover), a second playing screen for board games, etc.

Q3 I don't think Singletons are bad per se. They do come with a hefty price tag, though. They come convenient at early stages, just like global variables do.

They get very expensive, soon. There's no ownership, everything is shared, no chance to change a single bit without effecting the other users of that object. Reusability for objects depending on singletons is poor, as you always need those singletons as well. I tend to avoid them most of the time. And whenever I had one of them in my code, getting rid of them was a good decision.

As for the notifications: they are really designed for communicating on a system level. They shouldn't be abused for normal application logic and communication. It's a broadcast for system level events. If you use them as a substitute for object communication, this is a sure way to hell. This takes every logic out of the code, and there's no way build up responsible code.

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First things first: don't use this

@interface BankAccount: NSObject
{
    double accountBalance;
    long accountNumber;
}
-(double) getAccountBalance;
-(void) setAccountBalance: (double) x;
@end

Here, the accountBalance ivar is public, while it should be private.

Instead, use a @property:

@interface BankAccount: NSObject
    @property (assign, nonatomic) double accountBalance;
@end

That'll define a setter:

- (void)setAccountBalance:(double)accountBalance { ... }

and a getter:

- (double)accountBalance { ... }

and a private instance variable (ivar) named _accountBalance.

You can then, in your implementation, use:

@synthesize accountBalance;

which will automatically create the setter/getter like this:

- (void)setAccountBalance:(double)accountBalance {
    _accountBalance = accountBalance;
}

- (double)accountBalance {
    return _accountBalance;
}
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Q1) Model-layer objects, especially ones that will be interacted with and mutated, should be responsible for their own internal representation as well as representing the knowledge of the rules of the interactions. For a bank account, I think both the approaches you present are wrong. The second in particular because it is actually taking even the responsibility of updating the state away from the account. But the first also because it only provides a setBalance method, which doesn't make sense in the real world. Whoever uses that account has to now handle all the logic of transfers, withdrawals, deposits, interest, and so on. Really, a bank account should have the methods deposit withdraw balance and so on, that way it can represent the rules and logic by which these interactions happen. In this case drawing from how this would work in real life can be helpful.

Q2) A lot of this depends on how your app is set up. A simple app's model layer may be just a plist or NSUserDefaults and some NSDictionary instances. In that case you might not want to have a view controller interact with it, but maybe a data controller object. But you can probably get away with having view controllers talk to that kind of model. When things get more complex though, you definitely need to separate concerns, and have controller objects closer to the data model or have more sophisticated models providing the rules of their interactions. Personally I'd avoid having all the view controllers loading NSUserDefaults, you could just make a single data controller class that could handle that and instantiate it as needed.

Q3) I see two questions here. Not sure what you mean by "accessible to all controllers". But NSNotification is incredibly useful when used right. Say you have 3 view controllers, all coordinating a different view of the bank account - one is a ledger, one is a pie chart, one is a budget calculator. When the app makes a request to refresh the bank account's information from the internet, when that request comes back it can notify all three of these view controllers at once and they can refresh their views accordingly. It's really used any time you have more than one object interested in knowing that something happened.

Hope this helps and let me know if you have any questions.

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Thanks for your help Carl –  Ben Oct 11 '12 at 17:22
    
You're welcome @Ben! –  Carl Veazey Oct 12 '12 at 20:42

Read Stanford's lecture about MVC. I think you will find many answers there http://www.stanford.edu/class/cs193p/cgi-bin/drupal/node/205

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