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class A {
}

class B extends A {
}

class TestType {
   public static void main(String args[]) {
      A a = new B();
      // I wish to use reference 'a' to check the Reference-Type which is 'A'.
   }
}

Is is possible? If no, then please specif the reason.

share|improve this question
7  
You can't. The static type of local variables is not retained in the bytecode, nor at runtime. (If it's a field, you can use reflection on the field's containing class to get the field's type.) – Chris Jester-Young Oct 3 '12 at 6:53
1  
@ChrisJester-Young You should make that an answer instead of a comment. – Jesper Oct 3 '12 at 7:00
up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you call a.getClass() then it will always return you instance of class from which this object was created. In your case it is B so it will return you B.class.

Now if you want to call method on a and get class as A.class then you will not able to do it normal way.

One way out would be define method in A

public static Class<A> getType() {
        return A.class;
    }

and then you can call a.getType() which is A.class . We are making use of static method here because they are not overridden.

share|improve this answer
    
But this method would need added to every class for consistency , so when getType is called the method would be called for class B. – Ankur Oct 3 '12 at 7:36
    
Updated the answer to make use of static methods. – Amit Deshpande Oct 3 '12 at 7:37
    
Yes the solution worked. :) It was very elegant and simple solution. – Amber Oct 3 '12 at 7:47
    
Static methods are not overridden and hence there is no issue in using the method. – Amber Oct 3 '12 at 7:52

Chris Jester-Young's comment was excellent. It says:

You can't. The static type of local variables is not retained in the bytecode, nor at runtime. (If it's a field, you can use reflection on the field's containing class to get the field's type.)

See also What is the concept of erasure in generics in java?

And http://gafter.blogspot.com/search?q=super+type+token.

share|improve this answer

Check the class name of the reference holding an object in Java

You can't.

  1. There is no such thing as 'the reference holding an object. There could be zero such references, or there could be sixten gazillion of them.

  2. You can't get it/them from inside the object being held.

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