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Table View with Images, slow load and scroll

I have a UITableView which downloads images for the UITableViewCells from a server. I observed that the tableView scrolls very slowly.

I thought that this might downloading problem, but I have realized that the table still scrolls slowly after download has finished and the image icon size is less.

I searched Google but couldn't find any help.

- (UITableViewCell *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath
{
    btnBack.hidden = FALSE;

    static NSString *CellIdentifier = @"Cell";

    UITableViewCell *cell = [tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:CellIdentifier];

    if (cell == nil)
    {
        cell = [[[UITableViewCell alloc] initWithStyle:UITableViewCellStyleDefault reuseIdentifier:CellIdentifier] autorelease];
        cell.selectionStyle = UITableViewCellSelectionStyleNone;

        cell.accessoryType = UITableViewCellAccessoryDisclosureIndicator;
        cell.backgroundColor = [UIColor clearColor];

        cell.textLabel.font = [UIFont fontWithName:@"Noteworthy" size:17.0];
        cell.textLabel.font = [UIFont boldSystemFontOfSize:17.0];
        cell.textLabel.textColor = [UIColor blackColor];
        cell.textLabel.highlightedTextColor = [UIColor blackColor];
    }

        cell.textLabel.text = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"     %@", [test.arrTitle objectAtIndex:indexPath.row]];

        NSString *Path;
        Path = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"http://%@",[test.arrImages objectAtIndex:indexPath.row]];
        NSLog(@"image-->%@",[test.arrImages objectAtIndex:indexPath.row]);
        NSString *strImage = Path;
        NSURL *url4Image = [NSURL URLWithString:strImage];    
        NSData *data = [NSData dataWithContentsOfURL:url4Image];
        image =[[UIImage alloc] initWithData:data];
        cell.imageView.image =image;
        [image release];

        return cell;
}
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marked as duplicate by iCoder, Vikdor, Wh1T3h4Ck5, pad, AVD Oct 5 '12 at 5:58

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Have a look here stackoverflow.com/questions/7502073/… –  HeikoG Oct 3 '12 at 7:08

6 Answers 6

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You can use NSOperationQueue or GCD to do your lazy loading (see Concurrency Programming Guide for discussion of different asynchronous operations technologies). The former enjoys an advantage that you can specify precisely how many concurrent operations are permissible, which is very important in loading images from the web because many web servers limit how many concurrent requests they will accept from a given client.

The basic idea is:

  1. Submit request of the image data in a separate background queue;
  2. When done downloading image, dispatch UI update back to main queue because you should never do UI updates in the background;
  3. When running dispatched final UI update code on main queue, make sure the UITableViewCell is still visible and that it hasn't been dequeued and reused because the cell in question scrolled off the screen. If you don't do that, the wrong image may momentarily show up.

You would want to replace your code with something like the following code:

First, define a property for your NSOperationQueue that you will use for downloading images, as well as a NSCache for storing those images:

@property (nonatomic, strong) NSOperationQueue *imageDownloadingQueue;
@property (nonatomic, strong) NSCache *imageCache;

Second, initialize this queue and cache in viewDidLoad:

- (void)viewDidLoad
{
    [super viewDidLoad];

    self.imageDownloadingQueue = [[NSOperationQueue alloc] init];
    self.imageDownloadingQueue.maxConcurrentOperationCount = 4; // many servers limit how many concurrent requests they'll accept from a device, so make sure to set this accordingly

    self.imageCache = [[NSCache alloc] init];

    // the rest of your viewDidLoad
}

Third, your cellForRowAtIndexPath might look like:

- (UITableViewCell *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath
{
    btnBack.hidden = FALSE;

    static NSString *CellIdentifier = @"Cell";

    UITableViewCell *cell = [tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:CellIdentifier];

    if (cell == nil)
    {
        cell = [[[UITableViewCell alloc] initWithStyle:UITableViewCellStyleDefault reuseIdentifier:CellIdentifier] autorelease];
        cell.selectionStyle = UITableViewCellSelectionStyleNone;

        cell.accessoryType = UITableViewCellAccessoryDisclosureIndicator;
        cell.backgroundColor = [UIColor clearColor];

        cell.textLabel.font = [UIFont fontWithName:@"Noteworthy" size:17.0];
        cell.textLabel.font = [UIFont boldSystemFontOfSize:17.0];
        cell.textLabel.textColor = [UIColor blackColor];
        cell.textLabel.highlightedTextColor = [UIColor blackColor];
    }

    cell.textLabel.text = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"     %@", [test.arrTitle objectAtIndex:indexPath.row]];

    // code change starts here ... initialize image and then do image loading in background

    NSString *imageUrlString = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"http://%@", [test.arrImages objectAtIndex:indexPath.row]];
    UIImage *cachedImage = [self.imageCache objectForKey:imageUrlString];
    if (cachedImage)
    {
        cell.imageView.image = cachedImage;
    }
    else
    {
        // you'll want to initialize the image with some blank image as a placeholder

        cell.imageView.image = [UIImage imageNamed:@"blankthumbnail.png"];

        // now download in the image in the background

        [self.imageDownloadingQueue addOperationWithBlock:^{

            NSURL *imageUrl   = [NSURL URLWithString:imageUrlString];    
            NSData *imageData = [NSData dataWithContentsOfURL:imageUrl];
            UIImage *image    = nil;
            if (imageData) 
                image = [UIImage imageWithData:imageData];

            if (image)
            {
                // add the image to your cache

                [self.imageCache setObject:image forKey:imageUrlString];

                // finally, update the user interface in the main queue

                [[NSOperationQueue mainQueue] addOperationWithBlock:^{
                    // make sure the cell is still visible

                    UITableViewCell *updateCell = [tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:indexPath];
                    if (updateCell)
                        cell.imageView.image = image;
                }];
            }
        }];
    }

    return cell;
}

Fourth, and finally, while one might be inclined to write code to purge the cache in low memory situations, it turns out that it does this automatically, so no extra handling is needed here. If you manually simulate a low memory situation in the simulator, you won't see it evict its objects because NSCache doesn't respond UIApplicationDidReceiveMemoryWarningNotification, but during actual operation, when memory is low, the cache will be purged.

I might suggest a bunch of other optimizations (e.g. perhaps also caching images into persistent storage to streamline future operations; I actually put all of this logic in my own AsyncImage class), but first see if this solves the basic performance issue.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks rob for giving code but my images are jumping from one cell to other cell while scrolling. –  anil kumar Oct 4 '12 at 11:51
    
thanks alot rob now it's working fine. –  anil kumar Oct 4 '12 at 12:02
    
hi Rob! first of all very well written code. I used your code but having a little query my Images and other data are coming from a JSON file, and the text data is coming perfectly but images are taking loads of time to show, most of the time images do not loads. why is this so? I mean I am stuck here why it is happening..hoping for your prompt response. Thanks! –  DeepK May 7 '13 at 10:55
    
Awesome, it works perfectly....:) thanks @rob –  Tulon Oct 8 '13 at 19:07

Write this in your UITableView cellForRowAtIndex: Method

asyncImageView = [[AsyncImageView alloc]initWithFrame:CGRectMake(30,32,100, 100)];         
[asyncImageView loadImageFromURL:[NSURL URLWithString:your url]];
[cell addSubview:asyncImageView];
[asyncImageView release];

Need to import AsyncImageView class and create Object For that Class

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This does not seem like good application of AsyncImageView. After download of image is complete, proper asynchronous loading of images in tableview should be checking to make sure the cell in question is still on screen (e.g. [self.tableview cellForRowAtIndexPath:indexPath] != nil) before updating. If you flip through tableview quickly (esp if images are large), cells can be dequeued and reused by the time the image download is done. –  Rob Oct 4 '12 at 6:28

As said earlier: don't do any heavy lifting in cellForRowAtIndexPath You can easily get around by using GCD. loading images from a background thread using blocks

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You should look to use an NSOperationQueue to handle lazy loading of images and a custom tableviewcell. You can get sample example for NSOperationQueue here

Google for tweetie custom tableviewcell That should set you in the right direction.

Apple has a sample project for downloading images in tableViews: LazyTableImages

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It is advisable that you store the images in an array and populate them in your viewDidLoad, and then in your cellForRowAtIndexPath: just set

cell.imageView.image = [yourImageArray objectAtIndex:indexPath.row];

As far as the slownesss is concerned, it is because you block the main thread with downloading the URLDATA in your cellForRowAtIndexPath method,so while scrolling unless and until the image is not fetched your main thread in which the application runs will get blocked.

share|improve this answer
    
I understand the intuitive appeal of this approach, but while this solves the slow scrolling, it replaces it with a worse problem, a very slow initial loading of the tableview. This is also a pretty extravagant use of memory. Generally, most of us have gone to asynchronous lazy loading for optimal performance and memory utilization reasons. Perhaps you can refine this with some asynchronous preloading of some smart subset of the image cache (e.g. the next group of images), but that's non-trivial, and there are a bunch of other caching and optimizations I'd pursue before going there. –  Rob Oct 4 '12 at 13:04

Scrolling very slow because you are loading images in main thread i.e. synchronously. You can do the same in background thread i.e.asynchronously, have a look at SDWebImage.

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thanks for quick reply am new to iPhone programing i tried this but at Add headers my Xcode doesn't shown "Other Linker Flags" setting and add the "-ObjC" flag –  anil kumar Oct 3 '12 at 7:05

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