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Here I have a sample of code.

I would like to know other way to write this code; specially I would like to know other forms for the nested if.

Also I would like your opinion about commenting (what are the best practice, is my style of commenting sufficient in professional environment?)

If this question is out of scope for SO please let me know, I will remove it please do not down vote I just try to learn about programming ;-).

// Has User expressed his preference?
if (!repositoryDevice.HasDevicePreference(userDevice))   // If not ...
{
    // Save the preference
    repositoryPreference.Add(userDevice.UserId, candidateId);
    result = true;
}
else   // If yes ... 
{
    // If a User has express his preference more than 1 hour ago
    // allow the User to change his preference, otherwise not
    if (!HasUserRecentPreference(userDevice))
    {
        repositoryPreference.Add(userDevice.UserId, candidateId);
        result = true;
    }
}
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4  
Well it's more suitable for CodeReview instead of StackOverflow... –  Adriano Oct 3 '12 at 8:00
    
Thanks Adriano, how to move it to Codereview? Let me know thanks! –  GibboK Oct 3 '12 at 8:01
    
@Adriano codereview.stackexchange.com is still in Beta but yeah, this is more suitable place than Stack Overflow for this kind of questions. –  Shadow Wizard Oct 3 '12 at 8:02
1  
Instead of comments, make the line of code you are commenting into a method (that you can Unit Test). Self-descriptive code needs little or no comments. You are nearly there with the method names in the if. I would also put the blocks the other way round. It's easier to look at conditions without negation, so I'd have: if(User.HasDevicePreference..... –  Michael Oct 3 '12 at 8:03
    
Thanks Michael, could would you please give me an example? –  GibboK Oct 3 '12 at 8:07
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5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can put else and if on the same line:

    result = true;

    // Has User expressed his preference or 
    // if a User has express his preference more than 1 hour ago
    // allow the User to change his preference
    if (!repositoryDevice.HasDevicePreference(userDevice) ||
        !HasUserRecentPreference(userDevice))
    {
        // Save the preference
        repositoryPreference.Add(userDevice.UserId, candidateId);
    }
    else
    {
        // result = false?
    }

It is also possible (as someone else pointed out) to use the &&/|| operators to merge the two conditions into a single block of code. Assuming that the code in the two blocks are identical, that is of course the preferred solution: never write the same line twice.

Otherwise, it looks very much good enough! :) It's generally considered a good idea to avoid source code complexity.

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Thanks good point, about my recent edit. What do you think about my styling of commenting?to verbose? any advice? thanks for your help! –  GibboK Oct 3 '12 at 8:03
1  
@GibboK, the // if not/yes are redundant. Otherwise, it's good to explain what you're trying to achieve. –  Zanathel Oct 3 '12 at 8:09
    
-1 for condoning DRY –  jenson-button-event Oct 3 '12 at 8:18
    
@BobTodd I certainly do not condone DRY, which is why you have my comment underneath the code block. I did not realize that the code blocks were identical until John Woo pointed it out, hence my +1 to his response. –  Zanathel Oct 3 '12 at 8:36
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You can combine the two condition into one using OR

if (!repositoryDevice.HasDevicePreference(userDevice) || !HasUserRecentPreference(userDevice))
{
    result = true;
    repositoryPreference.Add(userDevice.UserId, candidateId);
}
else
{
    // put your else clause here
}
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any reason why you placed result = true before repository... thanks for your time –  GibboK Oct 3 '12 at 8:14
1  
none. they are interchangeable provided that result is not a shared variable and is not being access by repositoryPreference. but if it is, then it has different meaning. I assumed result will be the returned value I guess. –  John Woo Oct 3 '12 at 8:16
    
infact result is a returned value. thanks for commenting! –  GibboK Oct 3 '12 at 8:18
1  
actually your accepted answer (if your if statement is not nested), is still the same as yours. –  John Woo Oct 3 '12 at 8:21
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It is logic operation, assume:

X = repositoryDevice.HasDevicePreference(userDevice)
Y = HasUserRecentPreference(userDevice)

So, code lines:

    repositoryPreference.Add(userDevice.UserId, candidateId);
    result = true;

will execute if:

(NOT X) || (X && (NOT Y)) =  ((NOT X) || X) && (NOT X || NOT Y) 
                          = 1 && (NOT X || NOT Y)
                          = (NOT X || NOT Y)

So best alternative:

if (!repositoryDevice.HasDevicePreference(userDevice)
       ||  (!HasUserRecentPreference(userDevice)))
{
    // Save the preference
    repositoryPreference.Add(userDevice.UserId, candidateId);
    result = true;
}
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The //If not and //If yes are unnecessary. You don't explain what you implicitly write.

E.g.

int x = 5; //assign 5 to x

would be stupid, everybody can see that. My small optimization:

// Has User expressed his preference?
if (!repositoryDevice.HasDevicePreference(userDevice)) 
{
    // Save the preference
    repositoryPreference.Add(userDevice.UserId, candidateId);
    result = true;
}
// If a User has express his preference more than 1 hour ago
// allow the User to change his preference, otherwise not
else if (!HasUserRecentPreference(userDevice))
{
    repositoryPreference.Add(userDevice.UserId, candidateId);
    result = true;

}
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Thanks Remy for your answer I really appreciate it! –  GibboK Oct 3 '12 at 8:06
    
-1 for condoning DRY –  jenson-button-event Oct 3 '12 at 8:16
    
"condoning DRY"? I'm confused? –  Remy Oct 3 '12 at 8:21
1  
    
Right, because I didn't combine the two if / else. Fair enough. Didn't see that :-( –  Remy Oct 3 '12 at 8:26
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You are describing behaviour. Behaviour is usually encapsualted best within classes.

I find one pattern that is useful for ridding code of unwelcome conditional nesting is the template method pattern.

Here you progressively override predefine behaviour with specialisms of that behaviour.

However, for cleaner code why not make the rule part of the method?

repositoryPreference.TryAdd(userDevice, candidateId);

public void TryAdd(UserDevice userDevice, candidateId) {
 if (!repositoryDevice.HasDevicePreference(userDevice)) return;
 if (!HasUserRecentPreference(userDevice)) return;
 // do the add
}
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Very interesting approach, in my case I use Repository Pattern plus a Service Layer... any way I will have a deep look at your link. Many thanks! –  GibboK Oct 3 '12 at 12:24
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