Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to split a string by a specified delimiter according to this example: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ftsafwz3(v=VS.90).aspx

My code compiles without errors in Visual C++ 2010, but when I want to run it, I get this error message:

Unhandled exception at 0x773a15de in Test.exe: 0xC0000005: Access violation reading location 0x00000000.

Here's my code:

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>
#include <sstream>
#include <regex>

using namespace std;

vector<char *> splitString(char in[])
{
vector<char *> parts(15);
char seps[]   = " ,\t\n";
char *next_token1 = NULL;
char *token1 = NULL;
token1 = strtok_s(in, seps, &next_token1);
while ((token1 != NULL))
{
    if (token1 != NULL)
    {
        token1 = strtok_s( NULL, seps, &next_token1);
                    //printf( " %s\n", token1 );
        parts.push_back(token1);
    }
}
return parts;
}

int main(int argc, char * argv[])
{
char string1[] =
    "A string\tof ,,tokens\nand some  more tokens";
vector<char *> parts=splitString(string1);
cout << parts[0] <<endl;
cout << parts[1] <<endl;
return 0;
}

It seems to be illegal that I try to display the vector's elements, but why?

The vector's capacity should be sufficient and a

printf( " %s\n", token1 );

in the while loop prints out the tokens!

share|improve this question
    
Note that in addition to the problem with the invalid access addressed by hmjd's answer, you're throwing away the first token. –  Michael Burr Oct 3 '12 at 8:16
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The use of vector is incorrect. It is constructed with 15 elements and then push_back() is used to add the strings which adds new elements after the initial 15. This means the first 15 elements are unassigned (null):

std::cout << parts[0] << end; // parts[0] is null

Either:

  • don't preallocate elements at construction, or
  • use operator[] and not push_back() (add additional loop terminator to protect going beyond the end of the vector)

(Consider changing to std::vector<std::string>.)

Just to mention boost::split() that can produces a list of tokens (std::vector<std::string>) from an input string and permits specification of multiple delimiters.

share|improve this answer
    
I incorrectly did this to reserve slots in advance to increase efficiency. Thanks for your advice, it solves my prob! –  bogus Oct 4 '12 at 22:18
    
vector class has a method to do just that : reserve(slots). See cplusplus.com/reference/vector/vector/reserve for more details. –  da_m_n Mar 18 at 21:57
add comment

The trouble is A general word of caution: you're using strtok (family of) functions in c++. Note that this old API modifies it's argument. This is frequently not what you expect, and for this reason I'd advise against using this C library function.

Furthermore you are assuming that 15 elements will be read, leaving the 'surplus' elements uninitialized. This, too, results in undefined behaviour on accessing those elements.


May I suggest a C++ approach, since you are using it:

#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>
#include <iterator>
#include <algorithm>

using namespace std;

vector<std::string> splitString(const char in[])
{
    std::istringstream iss(in);
    std::istream_iterator<std::string> first(iss), last;

    std::vector<std::string> parts;
    std::copy(first, last, std::back_inserter(parts));
    return parts;
}

int main(int argc, char * argv[])
{
    const char string1[] = "A string\tof ,,tokens\nand some  more tokens";
    vector<std::string> parts = splitString(string1);
    cout << parts[0] <<endl;
    cout << parts[1] <<endl;
    return 0;
}

This uses the fact that, by default, iostreams will skipws (skip whitespace)

share|improve this answer
1  
The trouble is, you're using strtok (family of) functions to modify an unmodifiable string literal. There is no modifying of string-literals in OP's code. –  ForEveR Oct 3 '12 at 8:31
    
@ForEveR <strike>I think you may be wrong</strike>: MSDN says: Each call to strtok_s modifies strToken by inserting a null character after the token returned by that call EDIT Oh wait, I see what you meant. string1 is initialized from a literal, not pointing to the actual data. Fixing –  sehe Oct 3 '12 at 8:37
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.