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There's the following class:

public class LivingBeing { … }

Then there's

public class Human extends LivingBeing { … }

Now there's also this wrapper:

public class LivingBeingWrapper<T extends LivingBeing> { … }

And to complete the picture there's also the method

public boolean validate(LivingBeingWrapper<LivingBeing> livingBeingWrapper)

Now when writing the following code

LivingBeingWrapper<Human> wrapper = createHumanWrapper();
validate(wrapper);

I get the following compile error:

The method validate(LivingBeingWrappe<LivingBeing> livingBeingWrapper) in the type MyType is not applicable for the arguments (LivingBeingWrapper<Human>).

But why? Human extends LivingBeing.

share|improve this question
    
<LivingBeing> means only LivingBeing, <? extends LivingBeing> means it can extend LivingBeing. e.g. Human. –  Peter Lawrey Oct 3 '12 at 8:29
    
I think you're suffering from type erasure... Still, +1 for a well structured question –  Redandwhite Oct 3 '12 at 8:29
    
can you try: public boolean validate(LivingBeingWrapper<? extends LivingBeing> livingBeingWrapper) –  Redandwhite Oct 3 '12 at 8:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your validate method declares that it must be called with a LivingBeingWrapper parameterised with LivingBeing. However, you're passing in a LivingBeingWrapper parameterised with Human. Try changing your method declaration from this:

public boolean validate(LivingBeingWrapper<LivingBeing> livingBeingWrapper)

to this:

public boolean validate(LivingBeingWrapper<? extends LivingBeing> livingBeingWrapper)
share|improve this answer

A banana is-a fruit. But a list of bananas is not a list of fruit. Otherwise you could take a list of bananas and add an apple (given that an apple is-a fruit).

That sounds rather gnomic, but it's key to what's happening above. You need to specify your wrapper such that it takes types extending LivingBeing.

For further info, see this article, and in particular the "Generics are not Covariant" section.

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I love this explanation. If you add concrete advice too, I'll delete my answer. –  David Grant Oct 3 '12 at 8:33

Change your below method: -

public boolean validate(LivingBeingWrapper<LivingBeing> livingBeingWrapper)

to

public boolean validate(LivingBeingWrapper<T> livingBeingWrapper)

Since this method is inside your class which is like: -

public class LivingBeingWrapper<T extends LivingBeing> 

So, you can use the type T in your method parameter, and T will be replaced by Horse.. For your particular reference..

And if your method takes some different type than the one in class definition (T), then you can use this declaration: -

public boolean validate(LivingBeingWrapper<? extends LivingBeing> 
                                                    livingBeingWrapper)

Now, if you have to call validate(LivingBeingWrapper<Human>), your method has to be defined to take generic type parameter type Human, which extends LivingBeing, which is what your T type is (As it also extends LivingBeing in your class definition)

share|improve this answer
    
validate isn't a method on LivingBeingWrapper. –  David Grant Oct 3 '12 at 8:36
    
@DavidGrant.. ??? Can't get what you are telling.. –  Rohit Jain Oct 3 '12 at 8:44
    
You're using T. But validate isn't necessarily a method on a parameterized class. –  David Grant Oct 3 '12 at 8:47
    
@DavidGrant.. Yeah that I assumed that it is inside that class.. So, I have mentioned it.. Edited post to add that part.. –  Rohit Jain Oct 3 '12 at 8:49

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