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Suppose you have something like the following:

class Shape  // base class
{
private:
    bool degenerate, ill_defined;
    ...
public:
    bool isVoid  () { return false; }
    bool isCircle() { return false; }
    bool isPoint () { return false; }
    bool isPlane () { return false; }
    bool isSphere() { return false; }
    ...
};

class Void : public Shape {
    ...
}

class Plane : public Shape
{
public:
    bool isPlane() { return !degenerate && !ill_defined; }
    bool isVoid () { return ill_defined; }
    ...
    operator Void () throw() { 
        if (isVoid()) return Void(); 
        else throw ...; //some error
    }
    ...
}

class Point : public Shape {
private:
    double radius;
    ...
public:
    bool isPoint() { return !ill_defined; }
    bool isVoid () { return ill_defined; }
    ...        
    operator Void () throw() { ... }
    ...
}

class Circle : public Shape // similar to the rest

class Sphere : public Shape // similar to the rest

The intersection between a Plane and a Sphere can be either

  • a Circle (if the plane "cuts through" the sphere)
  • a Point (if the plane "just touches" the sphere)
  • a Void (if the sphere lies entirely above or below the plane)

I was wondering how to best define and use an intersection between a Plane and a Sphere, since the return type of the hypothetical

intersect(const Sphere& S, const Plane& P)

method/free function is unknown at compile time.

I never encountered this situation before, so I looked up some possible ways to do it. I came across this question which recommends boost::variant. In my situation, that would look like

boost::variant<Void, Point, Circle> intersection = 
    intersect(const Sphere& S, const Plane& P);

But this has three drawbacks:

  1. It's fugly.
  2. something like intersection.radius cannot be used as-is, since Point and Void do not have a radius. You'd have to do something like

    if (intersection.isPoint()){
        ...
    }
    else if (intersection.isCircle())
    {
        // possibly cast to Point if degenerate, otherwise:
        double R = intersection.radius;
        ...
    }
    // etc.
    
  3. The user of a library implementing all these shapes would always have to know what types could be returned by intersecting two shapes. That is, the user would always have to declare something of type boost::variant<scope::Void, scope::Point, scope::Circle> which is complicated and just plain ugly. Fortunately, c++11 has the auto keyword for that. Alternatively, you could use a member like so

    class Sphere : public Shape
    {
        ...
    public: 
    
        boost::variant<scope::Void, scope::Point, scope::Circle>
            intersect_type;
    
        intersect_type intersect(const Plane& P);
    
        ...
    };
    

    so that we can use

    Sphere::intersect_type t = S.intersect(P);
    

    where S is an instance of Sphere and P an instance of Plane. But then still we'd have to have separate handling of all possible types:

    if (intersection.isPoint()){
        ...
    }
    else if (intersection.isCircle()){
        intersection.radius;
    }
    // etc.
    

so that the complexity we tried to take away from the user is actually still there.

I feel like I'm missing something here. Perhaps there is a smarter way to implement my Shape baseclass? Or should I create a separate, dedicated Intersect class? What solution is most elegant, efficient and effective for this situation?

share|improve this question
    
I'm not sure if I got the question completely. The function intersect doesn't know the concrete class it is going to return until runtime. Then how can callers bind to a concrete type at compile time? They have to bind to a pointer to base class, right? –  Vikas Oct 3 '12 at 9:59

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Off-hand:

The isXXXX() predicate methods seem like a code smell to me. You'd do

  • if (dynamic_cast<Circle*>(shapePtr)) with RTTI usually
  • Or use variant::which() and/or variant::type() to discriminate the variant's stored value

To your question:

There are several possible approaches.

  1. The classic OO approach would be to just derive everything from Shape and always return a std::unique_ptr<Shape> (or similar).

  2. However, obviously, you can do modern C++ static OO, in which case you'd end up with something similar to the variant. You'd then write a visitor to handle different cases:

(live on http://liveworkspace.org/code/bad329cb40d94a21531e1153f4c0877b)

#include <string>
#include <iostream>
#include <boost/lexical_cast.hpp>
#include <boost/variant.hpp>
#include <boost/variant/static_visitor.hpp>

struct Shape 
{ 
    /*virtual*/ double getSurface() const { return 42.0; }  // TODO
};

struct Circle : Shape {};
struct Point : Shape {};
struct Rect : Shape {};

struct Nil {};

typedef boost::variant<Nil, Circle, Point, Rect> Intersect;

struct DescribeVisitor : boost::static_visitor<std::string>
{
    std::string operator()(Circle const& s) const {
        return std::string("Got a circle of ") + boost::lexical_cast<std::string>(s.getSurface());
    }

    std::string operator()(Rect const& s) const {
        return std::string("Got a rectangle of ") + boost::lexical_cast<std::string>(s.getSurface());
    }

    std::string operator()(Point const& s) const {
        return std::string("Got a point of ") + boost::lexical_cast<std::string>(s.getSurface()); // mmm bit funny :)
    }

    std::string operator()(Nil const&) const {
        return std::string("Got an empty intersection");
    }
};

std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, Intersect const& i)
{
    return os << boost::apply_visitor(DescribeVisitor(), i);
}

int main(int argc, const char *argv[])
{
    Intersect describe = Point();
    std::cout << describe << std::endl;

    describe = Rect();
    std::cout << describe << std::endl;

    describe = Circle();
    std::cout << describe << std::endl;
}

Output:

Got a point of 42
Got a rectangle of 42
Got a circle of 42
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a bunch, this is indeed what I was looking for. –  Rody Oldenhuis Oct 3 '12 at 11:34

In my opinion you could:

1) Create overloaded operators/functions that return void *, which in turn would be linked to a member variable that holds it's true return value, as well as another member function with it's type.

2) Use a template, though that could be more trouble than it's worth.

3) Continue on with the boost::variant, and with the use of (but not death to) macro's clean it up some.

Granted, I'm mostly used to the C++98 still, ergo auto is just something I'm starting to play with. It may offer solace in the return as well, since it's determined at runtime I believe.

share|improve this answer
    
Could you give a small example of your first suggestion? –  Rody Oldenhuis Oct 3 '12 at 10:01
    
Judging by how the question sounds: [code]//In class shape member variables void rVal; int type; // 0 for point, 1 for circle, 2 for void, etc. void *intersect(const Sphere& S, const Plane& P) { //Do as needed if(isPoint) // If it's a point intersection { rVal = (void)new Point; //Might be moot to cast to void *, but I'm a big fan of same type; old habits die hard type = 0; } //Other stuff here return rVal; }[/code] –  M4rc Oct 3 '12 at 10:16
    
Though, seeing the reply's I didn't even think of sehe's response, which is a great option as well. –  M4rc Oct 3 '12 at 10:21
    
I see, sort of the C way of doing it. Effective, but as @sehe indicated, smelly. I'm gonna go for his option. Thanks for thinking with me! –  Rody Oldenhuis Oct 3 '12 at 11:30

If interaction with your shape types strictly depends on specific type and could not be reduced to some unified base interface that can be used in polymorphic way then the only thing that could help you to manage complexity is some form of Visitor pattern. You could make it intruisive with your class hierarchy, but boost::variant already has useful support for it - boost::static_visitor:

// Define processing for intersection types
struct IntersectionProcessor: boost::static_visitor<>
{
    void operator()(Sphere&)
    {
       // Process Sphere
    }

    void operator()(Point&)
    {
       // Process Point
    }

    void operator()(Void&)
    {
       // Process Void
    }

    template <typename T> void operator()(T&)
    {
       // Process any other shape
    }
};

// Usage
Sphere A;
Plane B;
auto intersectResult = intersect(A, B);
boost::apply_visitor(IntersectionProcessor(), intersectResult);

// Also easy to use as functor applied to container of results:
std::vector<intersect_type> intResVec = getIntersectionResults();
std::for_each(intResVec.begin(), intResVec.end(),
   boost::apply_visitor(IntersectionProcessor));
share|improve this answer

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