Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
List versus ArrayList variable type?

I'm intialising a HashSet like so in my program:

Set<String> namesFilter = new HashSet<String>();

Is this functionally any different if I initilise like so?

HashSet<String> namesFilter = new HashSet<String>();

I've read this about the collections interface, and I understand interfaces (well, except their use here). I've read this excerpt from Effective Java, and I've read this SO question, but I feel none the wiser.

Is there a best practice in Java, and if so, why? My intuition is that it makes casting to a different type of Set easier in my first example. But then again, you'd only be casting to something that was a collection, and you could convert it by re-constructing it.

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Jon Skeet, Jesper, duffymo, Thomas Jungblut, Pureferret Oct 3 '12 at 9:45

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
I prefer using the interface. If you already know all the arguments, what's the question? What's the problem? –  duffymo Oct 3 '12 at 9:40
    
    
@duffymo I've heard the arguments, but they haven't helped me understand. The answer here and the answer in the proposed dupe make sense however. –  Pureferret Oct 3 '12 at 9:45

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I think it's better practice to use the interface over the concrete type, i.e.

Set<String> strings = new HashSet<String>();

By doing this, you commit yourself to only using the functionality provided by the Set interface. This makes it easier to swap out the kind of set you're using at a later date if you decide that you want different performance characteristics (e.g. if you wanted to use a TreeSet instead) without worrying about breaking your code.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.