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I m making a 2D board game for python for hw.

I asked user to input a integer for the board size. for example, 7. I have modified a bit (only show the important ones) before posting. the function is like follows

def asksize():           
    while True:
        ask=raw_input("Input board size: ")  
        try:
            size=int(ask)
            return size

        except ValueError: 
            print "Please enter a integer"   

Because it is variable board size, I need reuse the variable size in other function, use it for checking user's move is valid or not, how can I reuse the variable?

def checkmove(move):    
    #move is sth like eg. A1:B2
    move=move.split(":") #I split it so it becomes ['A','1']['B','2']  
    if size>=int(move[0][1]) and int(move[0][1])>=1 and size>=int(move[1][1]) and int(move[1][1])>=1: #for example if board size is 7, this is to check whether user input is between 1 to 7 within the board
        return True
    else:
        return False 

In my checkmove function, I can't use size in my argument because it is not defined, how can I make it workable?

Thanks

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Making the variable size global is an option, but you should consider your functions as an API, and use them on the game main bucle.

so storing the input like this:

size = asksize() #store the data on to variable called size
#then just call your check move
checkmove(x)

Anyway this is a bad exercise, its better to pass the variable through the function inside the game code:

#definitions
def asksize():
    #your code here
def checkmove(move, size):
    #your code here


#game set up here
size = asksize()
#more set up stuff
#end of game set up
#Game Main code

while True: #main game bucle
#Game stuff here
checkmove(move, size)
#more game stuff
share|improve this answer

Consider creating a class to represent the board. Then size is naturally an instance variable

class Board(object):

    def asksize(self):           
        while True:
            ask=raw_input("Input board size: ")  
            try:
                self.size=int(ask)
                return        
            except ValueError: 
                print "Please enter a integer"   

    def checkmove(self, move):    
        #move is sth like eg. A1:B2
        move=move.split(":") #I split it so it becomes ['A','1']['B','2']  
        if self.size>=int(move[0][1]) and int(move[0][1])>=1 and self.size>=int(move[1][1]) and int(move[1][1])>=1: #for example if board size is 7, this is to check whether user input is between 1 to 7 within the board
            return True
        else:
            return False 


# Use it like this
board = Board()
board.asksize()
move = some_function_that_returns_a_move()
board.checkmove(move)
share|improve this answer
    
thank you, it might work. –  user1687703 Oct 3 '12 at 10:20

You've got (at least) two choices:

  1. pass size as a parameter in the checkmove function.
  2. call size= asksize() in the checkmove function.

I would say it makes more sense to pass size in as a parameter, since then you can reuse the same function for an AI player...

That is:

def checkmove(move, size):
    # rest of definition

# main bit of code

size = asksize()
checkmove(move, size)
share|improve this answer
    
I have tried your (2). It turns out that it asks user to enter board size again, but not returning the value of the size –  user1687703 Oct 3 '12 at 9:52
    
@user1687703 yes it does (ask for the size in the function)! Without the entire code it was impossible to know if that was wanted. 1. is the better choice anyways. :) –  Andy Hayden Oct 3 '12 at 9:56
    
I am not so sure how I can get it after passing two parameters, could u explain more? –  user1687703 Oct 3 '12 at 9:57

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