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I have a table with the following type of data:

create table store (
    n_id             serial not null primary key,
    n_place_id       integer not null references place(n_id),
    dt_modified      timestamp not null,
    t_tag            varchar(4),
    n_status         integer not null default 0
    ...
    (about 50 more fields)
);

There are indices on n_id, n_place_id, dt_modified and all other fields used in the query below.

This table contains about 100,000 rows at present, but may grow to closer to a million or even more. Yet, for now let's assume we're staying at around the 100K mark.

I'm trying to select rows from these table where one two conditions are met:

  1. All rows where n_place_id is in a specific subset (this part is easy); or
  2. For all other n_place_id values the first ten rows sorted by dt_modified (this is where it becomes more complicated).

Doing it in one SQL seems to be too painful, so I'm happy with a stored function for this. I have my function defined thus:

create or replace function api2.fn_api_mobile_objects()
  returns setof store as
$body$
declare
    maxres_free integer := 10;
    resulter    store%rowtype;
    mcnt        integer := 0;
    previd      integer := 0;
begin
    create temporary table paid on commit drop as
    select n_place_id from payments where t_reference is not null and now()::date between dt_paid and dt_valid;

    for resulter in
        select * from store where n_status > 0 and t_tag is not null order by n_place_id, dt_modified desc
    loop
        if resulter.n_place_id in (select n_place_id from paid) then
            return next resulter;
        else
            if previd <> resulter.n_place_id then
                mcnt := 0;
                previd := resulter.n_place_id;
            end if;

            if mcnt < maxres_free then
                return next resulter;
                mcnt := mcnt + 1;
            end if;
        end if;
    end loop;
end;$body$
  language 'plpgsql' volatile;

The problem is that

select * from api2.fn_api_mobile_objects()

takes about 6-7 seconds to execute. Considering that after that this resultset needs to be joined to 3 other tables with a bunch of additional conditions applied and further sorting applied, this is clearly unacceptable.

Well, I still do need to get this data, so either I am missing something in the function or I need to rethink the entire algorithm. Either way, I need help with this.

share|improve this question
    
No need for functions or cursors here, IMHO. I would try a (self) join on a subquery with a window function in it. – wildplasser Oct 3 '12 at 10:00
    
if resulter.n_place_id in (select n_place_id from paid) then will result in quadratic behaviour (the temp table has no structure, so every "if" will result in a seqscan/linear search. – wildplasser Oct 3 '12 at 10:41
CREATE TABLE store
    ( n_id             serial not null primary key
    , n_place_id       integer not null -- references place(n_id)
    , dt_modified      timestamp not null
    , t_tag            varchar(4)
    , n_status         integer not null default 0
        );
INSERT INTO store(n_place_id,dt_modified,n_status)
SELECT n,d,n%4
FROM generate_series(1,100) n
, generate_series('2012-01-01'::date ,'2012-10-01'::date, '1 day'::interval ) d
        ;

WITH zzz AS (
        SELECT n_id AS n_id
        , rank() OVER (partition BY n_place_id ORDER BY dt_modified) AS rnk
        FROM store
        )
SELECT st.*
FROM store st
JOIN zzz ON zzz.n_id = st.n_id
WHERE st.n_place_id IN ( 1,22,333)
OR zzz.rnk <=10
        ;

Update: here is the same selfjoin construct as a subquery (CTEs are treated a bit differently by the planner):

SELECT st.*
FROM store st
JOIN ( SELECT sx.n_id AS n_id
        , rank() OVER (partition BY sx.n_place_id ORDER BY sx.dt_modified) AS zrnk
        FROM store sx
        ) xxx ON xxx.n_id = st.n_id
WHERE st.n_place_id IN ( 1,22,333)
OR xxx.zrnk <=10
        ;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this. Unfortunately, this takes much longer than the stored function I showed in my question. Stored function takes 6-7 seconds, your query - 11-12 seconds. – Aleks G Oct 3 '12 at 10:21
    
On second thought, the window function does not need to be sqeezed into a CTE. – wildplasser Oct 3 '12 at 10:23
    
I tried your updated SQL - it still takes about 10-11 seconds. I managed to get this down to about 1.3 seconds (see my own answer). – Aleks G Oct 3 '12 at 10:46
up vote 1 down vote accepted

After much struggle, I managed to get the stored function to return the results in just over 1 second (which is a huge improvement). Now the function looks like this (I added the additional condition, which didn't affect the performance much):

create or replace function api2.fn_api_mobile_objects(t_search varchar)
  returns setof store as
$body$
declare
    maxres_free integer := 10;
    resulter    store%rowtype;
    mid     integer := 0;
begin
    create temporary table paid on commit drop as
    select n_place_id from payments where t_reference is not null and now()::date between dt_paid and dt_valid
    union
    select n_place_id from store where n_status > 0 and t_tag is not null group by n_place_id having count(1) <= 10;

    for resulter in
        select * from store
        where n_status > 0 and t_tag is not null
        and (t_name ~* t_search or t_description ~* t_search)
        and n_place_id in (select n_place_id from paid)
    loop
        return next resulter;
    end loop;

    for mid in
        select distinct n_place_id from store where n_place_id not in (select n_place_id from paid)
    loop
        for resulter in
            select * from store where n_status > 0 and t_tag is not null and n_place_id = mid order by dt_modified desc limit maxres_free
        loop
            return next resulter;
        end loop;
    end loop;

end;$body$
  language 'plpgsql' volatile;

This runs in just over 1 second on my local machine and in about 0.8-1.0 seconds on live. For my purpose, this is good enough, although I am not sure what will happen as the amount of data grows.

share|improve this answer
    
If I understand correctly, you managed to avoid the silly IF(). I still think that a pure-SQL would perform better than this procedural code, but there could be something hidden in the missng details. – wildplasser Oct 3 '12 at 10:57
    
@wildpasser There are no other missing details, honestly. I timed it with different amounts of data. With number of rows low (under 2-3K, pure SQL is faster (but only marginally). As the number of rows grows, stored function becomes the winner. I even tested it with half a million of rows: stored function gave me results in about 3.5 seconds; pure sql - about 30 seconds. I think the reason for this is that the data is partitioned quite a bit but not uniformly. – Aleks G Oct 3 '12 at 11:02
    
The HAVING COUNT() < 10 does somthing different than your original question. – wildplasser Oct 3 '12 at 11:18
    
@wildplasser it does, but I do it in two parts: first I select those that have under 10 rows - and use all rows for them; then in the second loop I use inner loop for those that have more than 10 – Aleks G Oct 3 '12 at 11:21

As a simple suggestion, the way I like to do this sort of troubleshooting is to construct a query that gets me most of the way there, and optimize it properly, and then add the necessary pl/pgsql stuff around it. The major advantage to this approach is that you can optimize based on query plans.

Also if you aren't dealing with a lot of rows, array_agg() and unnest() are your friends as they allow you (on Pg 8.4 and later!) to dispense with the temporary table management overhead and simply construct and query an array of tuples in memory as a relation. It may perform better also if you are just hitting an array in memory instead of a temp table (less planning overhead and less query overhead too).

Also on your updated query I would look at replacing that final loop with a subquery or a join, allowing the planner to decide when to do a nested loop lookup or when to try to find a better way.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. Trust me, I've tried it in hundreds of different ways before settling on the final function I put in my owner answer. Working with arrays may be faster, but I do have a lot of data. In the part with n_place_id in (...) that inner select can return anywhere up to 30,000 entries, although in most case will be about 3,000. Add to this the fact that this call is for an API for a mobile app - and you may end up running a hundred of these at the same time. Hence temporary table is a better approach. – Aleks G Oct 4 '12 at 7:36
    
I'd test that to be sure. Chances are the temp table stuff is just going to go in the cache anyway, so not really sure it is going to perform better memory-wise or concurrency-wise than just keeping in the private process's memory. I am used to passing a 2x1000 arrays of text strings around which may not sound like that much in comparison but I am pretty sure the text strings used up more memory than 10x that many integers. – Chris Travers Oct 4 '12 at 7:41
    
I'll definitely test it, but I will also need to profile the memory carefully. Even by the minimum standards, with 64-bit integers (it's a 64-bit system) one process will take about 30K to store the array of 3,000 values. If I have a hundred of simultaneous processes, that will become 3M - still quite low. But what if the values grow? I'm not disputing the idea, just want to be careful with the memory usage. – Aleks G Oct 4 '12 at 7:44

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