Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'd like to know if there's any way to see (and not access neither modify) a private member from outside its class ?

template <typename type_>
class OBJ1
{
  //methods
};

class OBJ2
{
  private:
    OBJ1<int> my_obj;
};

class OBJ3
{
  public:
    template <typename type_>
    void magic_method(OBJ1<type_> obj)
    {
      //with another intermediate class, call one of OBJ1's public methods
      //anotherClass::call(obj);
    }
};

Obviously this does not work, as G++ does not know what is my_obj within class OBJ3. Is there a way to make this code compile ? Like forward declaration or something ? And again, other classes just need to know that "OBJ1 declared objects" exist.

Thanks !

share|improve this question
    
the argument of the method declaration shouldn't be (OBJ1<int> my_obj)? my_obj is not any type name. –  Kurospidey Oct 3 '12 at 9:55
    
@Kurospidey Yes, of course. I'll edit my post ! –  Patouf Oct 3 '12 at 9:56
1  
this code compiles what is the problem? –  Denis Ermolin Oct 3 '12 at 10:06
    
why don't you just make OBJ3 a friend class of OBJ2? That way you could access OBJ2 private section (other solution is changing order between OBJ3 and OBJ2 declarations and make magic_method a friend method of OBJ2). As i don't think you can see (see is another way of access) a private member of a class from an outside class. –  Kurospidey Oct 3 '12 at 10:08
    
@Denis Ermolin I'm not sure, but I think he's trying to access the OBJ1<int> member of OBJ2... –  Kurospidey Oct 3 '12 at 10:11

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted
// call one of OBJ1's *public* methods

You can easily make that work, as show below. What's the actual problem, and what does OBJ2 have to do with anything? Post code that displays the private access error you're concerned about.

#include <iostream>
#include <typeinfo>

template <typename type_>
class OBJ1
{
  public:
  void print_type_name() {
    std::cout << typeid(type_).name() << "\n";
  }
};

/*
class OBJ2
{
  private:
    OBJ1<int> my_obj;
};
*/

class anotherClass {
  public:
    template <typename type_>
    static void call(OBJ1<type_> obj) {
        obj.print_type_name();
    }
};

class OBJ3
{
  public:
    template <typename type_>
    void magic_method(OBJ1<type_> obj)
    {
      //with another intermediate class, call one of OBJ1's public methods
      anotherClass::call(obj);
    }
};

int main() {
    OBJ3 obj3;
    OBJ1<int> obj1;
    OBJ1<double> objd;
    obj3.magic_method(obj1);
    obj3.magic_method(objd);
}
share|improve this answer

Either

void magic_method(OBJ1<int>& my_obj)
{
  //with another intermediate class, call one of OBJ1's public methods
}

or, if you want OBJ1 to be generic:

template<typename T>
void magic_method(OBJ1<T>& my_obj)
{
  //with another intermediate class, call one of OBJ1's public methods
}
share|improve this answer

I'm not sure exactly what you want... but If I understand correctly you want to access OBJ2 private section from within OBJ3.

template <typename type_>
class OBJ1
{
  //methods
};

template <typename type_>
class OBJ2
{
  private:
    OBJ1<type_> my_obj;
    friend class OBJ3;
};

class OBJ3
{
  public:
    template <typename type_>
    void magic_method(OBJ2<type_> obj)
    {
      std::cout << obj.my_obj;
      //with another intermediate class, call one of OBJ1's public methods
      //anotherClass::call(obj);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.