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I'm pulling my hair out with this one.

I'm changing the resolution of the screen programatically using the following:

int FindBestVideoMode(int screen, unsigned int &width, unsigned int &height)
{
    int modeCount;
    XF86VidModeModeInfo** modes;

    if (XF86VidModeGetAllModeLines(display, screen, &modeCount, &modes))
    {
        int bestMode  = -1;
        int bestMatch = INT_MAX;
        for(int i = 0; i < modeCount; i ++)
        {
            int match = (width  - modes[i]->hdisplay) *
                        (width  - modes[i]->hdisplay) +
                        (height - modes[i]->vdisplay) *
                        (height - modes[i]->vdisplay);

            if(match < bestMatch)
            {
                bestMatch = match;
                bestMode  = i;
            }
        }

        width  = modes[bestMode]->hdisplay;
        height = modes[bestMode]->vdisplay;

        XFree(modes);

        return bestMode;
    }

    return -1;
}

void SwitchVideoMode(int screen, int mode)
{
    if (mode >= 0)
    {
        int modeCount;
        XF86VidModeModeInfo** modes;

        if (XF86VidModeGetAllModeLines(display, screen, &modeCount, &modes))
        {
            if (mode < modeCount)
            {
                XF86VidModeSwitchToMode(display, screen, modes[mode]);
                XF86VidModeSetViewPort(display, screen, 0, 0);


                XFlush(display);
            }

            XFree(modes);
        }
    }
}

void SwitchToBestVideoMode(int screen, unsigned int &width, unsigned int &height)
{
    SwitchVideoMode(screen, FindBestVideoMode(screen, width, height));
}

void RestoreVideoMode(int screen)
{
    auto iVideoMode = DefaultVideoModes.Find(screen);
    if (iVideoMode != nullptr)
    {
        XF86VidModeSwitchToMode(display, screen, &iVideoMode->value);
        XF86VidModeSetViewPort(display, screen, 0, 0);

        XFlush(display);
    }
}

This is working fine. I am then putting the window into fullscreen mode with the following:

XEvent e;
e.xclient.type         = ClientMessage;
e.xclient.window       = window;
e.xclient.message_type = _NET_WM_STATE;
e.xclient.format = 32;
e.xclient.data.l[0] = 2;    // _NET_WM_STATE_TOGGLE
e.xclient.data.l[1] = XInternAtom(display, "_NET_WM_STATE_FULLSCREEN", True);
e.xclient.data.l[2] = 0;    // no second property to toggle
e.xclient.data.l[3] = 1;
e.xclient.data.l[4] = 0;

XSendEvent(display, DefaultRootWindow(display), False, SubstructureRedirectMask | SubstructureNotifyMask, &e);
XMoveResizeWindow(display, window, 0, 0, width, height);

Now the problem is that the window is sized to that of the desktop resolution instead of the new resolution set when doing the programmatic resolution change. What I was expecting, and indeed what I'm after, is for the window to be sized to that of the new resolution.

I expect I'm just misunderstanding something simple here, but any ideas on this is greatly appreciated. I don't want to use external libraries here such SDL.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
If you're not switching display mode with XF86VidModeSwitch or XRandr - well, then you're still in desktop resolution and just creating window w/o WM decorations and placing it into upper-left corner. It's great when you need same resolution as desktop - you can freely toggle windows and have some other window above this one, but it's not perfect solution, ofc. –  keltar Oct 3 '12 at 11:00
    
If you don't want to use SDL, you can still read SDL source to see how it does it and replicate that bit of code in your project. –  Jan Hudec Oct 3 '12 at 13:08
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem you're running into is, that you rely on the window manager to properly place your window. Unfortunately not all WMs care about XF86VidMode or RandR. The canonical solution to create a fullscreen window after a video mode change is to create the window as borderless and "override redirect", so that it does not get managed by the WM, and then position it explicitly to cover the area from (0, 0) to (vidmode width, vidmode height).

share|improve this answer
    
@HavocP: Only that XF86VidMode is even less supported these days than RandR. Also believe it or not, but in some fullscreen applications, like games you actually want to prevent other programs from catching hotkeys (remember the darn Windows key issues, gamers pulling that key out of their keyboards, anyone?). The stacking issues can be resolved by going weird and create the window in either the screensaver or the composition layer. –  datenwolf Oct 16 '12 at 19:12
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