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Let's say I have the following classes:

public interface X {
...
}

public class A implements X {
...
}

public class B implements X {
...
}

Now let's say I have a method somewhere that takes an object of type X, and must handle each implementation of X differently. The naïve approach is:

public void doSomething(X x) {
  if(x instanceof A)
    doSomethingA((A) x);
  else if(x instanceof B)
    doSomethingB((B) x);
}

...but this seems particularly ugly and not polymorphic. What is the clean way of handling such a situation in general?

EDIT: Sure, it would be easy if I could push the implementation of doSomething() to classes A and B, but what about in situations where that doesn't make sense? i.e. doSomething() is defined on a class C and the implementation is highly dependent on C's internal state.

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1  
+1 for a subtle question that most people scan read and answer incorrectly. –  Duncan Oct 3 '12 at 11:07
    
I would try to redesign it then.BTW, do we need the 'general' doSomething(X x) method? –  Wizart Oct 3 '12 at 11:08
    
For example, can we simply pass required part of C's state to A's and B's implementations? Or split C.doSomethingA/B somehow to a few parts to have a common one in C, and different ones - in A and B respectively? –  Wizart Oct 3 '12 at 11:11
    
Can you share more information about what you're actually doing in these methods? It certainly feels like a redesign is necessary, but as the details are so abstract at the moment it's difficult to advise. –  Duncan Oct 3 '12 at 11:51
    
I've run into it in a few different situations. That's why I'm looking for a general solution. –  Kelsey Rider Oct 3 '12 at 12:14

7 Answers 7

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It's easy:

public interface X {
  int doSomething();
}

public class A implements X {
  public int doSomething() {
    // implementation in A
  }  
}

public class B implements X {
  public int doSomething() {
    // implementation in B
  }  

}

UPDATE: Ok, seems here we have some algorithm in C which dependants on C's state as well as on A/B differences. Then I would try to split that algorithm so that C class has only a common implementation for both A and B, and A-/B-dependent parts should go to an appropriate class as a particular implementation of the same method which is invoked in C. If possible, C's state can partially be passed to A's and B's doSomething

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1  
This is not the solution he wants to pass variables not call methods. –  Amit Deshpande Oct 3 '12 at 10:59
    
Ok, but I don't understand why it's necessary to pass the same object to the method. Moreover, there is 'this' inside doSomething, anyway –  Wizart Oct 3 '12 at 11:01
    
Since I haven't given any context, it may seem easy, but in practice it may not be so easy. See my edit. –  Kelsey Rider Oct 3 '12 at 11:02
    
Yes, got it. Asked some questions in comments to the question –  Wizart Oct 3 '12 at 11:14

You should push the implementation of doSomethingA to class A and doSomethingB to classB, define doSomething in the interface X and just call x.doSomething() (something in the lines of double-dispatch).

Considering the latest edit on the question about the dependency of the processing on X being of type A or B, instanceof operator certainly shouldn't be used because it establishes a hard-dependency on the underlying implementation class and the code would fail miserably when X x passed to C.doSomething() is a decorated instance.

AFAIK, the implementation of C.doSomething() will boil down to a point where you would have to use the information from either A or B and the steps run at the point should be abstracted into methods in A and B, declared in interface X. This will ensure that any new implementations of X also implement this method that C relies on, thereby making the code better maintainable. HTH.

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@AmitD, as can be seen from the question, the edit came after the responses. Please see the edit to my response, commenting on the new requirement in the question. –  Vikdor Oct 3 '12 at 11:09

The right way to do this would the visitor pattern

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+1, this is a schoolbook example for the visitor pattern. –  gustafc Oct 3 '12 at 11:46

first of all i would implement an interface rather then extend :) and my first tought would be this way

  class Parent {
      public Parent() {

      }
    }

    class Child extends Parent {
      public Child() {
        super();
      }
    }

    public class MainClass {
      public static void main(String[] a) {

        Child child = new Child();
        if (child instanceof Parent) {
          System.out.println("true");
        }

      }

    }
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Can you move do something() into the interface X? Then just call x.do something() without needing to cast or use instance of.

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It's more of a design problem. If A and B implementations of doSomething() depends heavily on a C object state, you could pass it as an argument : x.doSomething(C c)


Create doSomething() in interface X :

public interface X {
   doSomething(C c);
}

public class A extends X {
   doSomething(C c) {
    ...
   }
}

public class B extends X {
   doSomething(C c) {
    ...
   }
}

Then, your initial method becomes :

public void doSomething(X x) {
  x.doSomething(C c);
}
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 public interface X {
     doSomeThing();
    }

public class A implement X {
  doSomeThing(){}
}

public class B implement X {
   doSomeThing() {}
}

Now you can use

  X a = new A();
  a.doSomeThing();
share|improve this answer
    
This is not the solution he wants to pass variables not call methods. –  Amit Deshpande Oct 3 '12 at 11:00

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