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Some deadlocks are occurring in a database used by an API I'm working on. This is only happening when the API is load tested. During the initial investigation and research some importing indexes seemed to be missing and have now been applied. This seems to have resolved the deadlock issue. Before the indexes were applied SQL was performing an index scan. After the indexes were applied SQL was performing an index seek.

The reason for this question is to solidify my understanding of deadlocks. I'm still a bit confused as to why without the indexes the select statements caused an exclusive (X) Lock in MS SQL?

This is purely, I think, down to me not understanding the deadlock graph. From what I can see the 2 processes in the picture below are both doing selects.. so how can that cause the exclusive (X) lock? Is there something not on the graph perhaps?

Here is the deadlock graph which occurs without the extra indexes:

enter image description here

...and here is the XML ( from that graph:

<deadlock-list>
 <deadlock victim="process4c3708">
  <process-list>
   <process id="process4c3708" taskpriority="0" logused="1580" waitresource="KEY: 5:72057594038910976 (a94bedf44228)" waittime="99" ownerId="13602992" transactionname="user_transaction" lasttranstarted="2012-10-03T10:59:34.830" XDES="0x8cbf23b0" lockMode="S" schedulerid="3" kpid="7588" status="suspended" spid="67" sbid="0" ecid="0" priority="0" trancount="1" lastbatchstarted="2012-10-03T10:59:35.027" lastbatchcompleted="2012-10-03T10:59:35.020" clientapp=".Net SqlClient Data Provider" hostname="DEVMACHINE" hostpid="8440" loginname="user" isolationlevel="read committed (2)" xactid="13602992" currentdb="5" lockTimeout="4294967295" clientoption1="671088672" clientoption2="128056">
    <executionStack>
     <frame procname="adhoc" line="1" stmtstart="170" stmtend="728" sqlhandle="0x02000000b3a88339052734f326b9dbb95deb1d46fe4d192d">
select basefolder1_.Identifier as col_0_0_ from TradeInfo tradepr0_ inner join BaseFolder basefolder1_ on tradepr0_.BaseFolderId=basefolder1_.Id where basefolder1_.BoxId=@p0 and tradepr0_.PersonId=@p1 and tradepr0_.CurrentTrade=1 and tradepr0_.IsActive=1;     </frame>
     <frame procname="unknown" line="1" sqlhandle="0x000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000">
unknown     </frame>
    </executionStack>
    <inputbuf>
(@p0 uniqueidentifier,@p1 uniqueidentifier,@p2 uniqueidentifier,@p3 uniqueidentifier)select basefolder1_.Identifier as col_0_0_ from TradeInfo tradepr0_ inner join BaseFolder basefolder1_ on tradepr0_.BaseFolderId=basefolder1_.Id where basefolder1_.BoxId=@p0 and tradepr0_.PersonId=@p1 and tradepr0_.CurrentTrade=1 and tradepr0_.IsActive=1;
select basefolder1_.Identifier as col_0_0_ from TradeInfo tradepr0_ inner join BaseFolder basefolder1_ on tradepr0_.BaseFolderId=basefolder1_.Id where basefolder1_.BoxId=@p2 and tradepr0_.PersonId=@p3 and tradepr0_.SuspendedTrade=1 and tradepr0_.IsSuspended=1;
    </inputbuf>
   </process>
   <process id="process5dd4c8" taskpriority="0" logused="1580" waitresource="KEY: 5:72057594038910976 (b34811986aff)" waittime="301" ownerId="13602927" transactionname="user_transaction" lasttranstarted="2012-10-03T10:59:34.660" XDES="0xafb9f950" lockMode="S" schedulerid="4" kpid="2076" status="suspended" spid="61" sbid="0" ecid="0" priority="0" trancount="1" lastbatchstarted="2012-10-03T10:59:35.020" lastbatchcompleted="2012-10-03T10:59:35.020" clientapp=".Net SqlClient Data Provider" hostname="DEVMACHINE" hostpid="8440" loginname="user" isolationlevel="read committed (2)" xactid="13602927" currentdb="5" lockTimeout="4294967295" clientoption1="671088672" clientoption2="128056">
    <executionStack>
     <frame procname="adhoc" line="1" stmtstart="170" stmtend="728" sqlhandle="0x02000000b3a88339052734f326b9dbb95deb1d46fe4d192d">
select basefolder1_.Identifier as col_0_0_ from TradeInfo tradepr0_ inner join BaseFolder basefolder1_ on tradepr0_.BaseFolderId=basefolder1_.Id where basefolder1_.BoxId=@p0 and tradepr0_.PersonId=@p1 and tradepr0_.CurrentTrade=1 and tradepr0_.IsActive=1;     </frame>
     <frame procname="unknown" line="1" sqlhandle="0x000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000">
unknown     </frame>
    </executionStack>
    <inputbuf>
(@p0 uniqueidentifier,@p1 uniqueidentifier,@p2 uniqueidentifier,@p3 uniqueidentifier)select basefolder1_.Identifier as col_0_0_ from TradeInfo tradepr0_ inner join BaseFolder basefolder1_ on tradepr0_.BaseFolderId=basefolder1_.Id where basefolder1_.BoxId=@p0 and tradepr0_.PersonId=@p1 and tradepr0_.CurrentTrade=1 and tradepr0_.IsActive=1;
select basefolder1_.Identifier as col_0_0_ from TradeInfo tradepr0_ inner join BaseFolder basefolder1_ on tradepr0_.BaseFolderId=basefolder1_.Id where basefolder1_.BoxId=@p2 and tradepr0_.PersonId=@p3 and tradepr0_.SuspendedTrade=1 and tradepr0_.IsSuspended=1;
    </inputbuf>
   </process>
  </process-list>
  <resource-list>
   <keylock hobtid="72057594038910976" dbid="5" objectname="ccp.dbo.TradeInfo" indexname="PK__Activity__3214EC07060DEAE8" id="lock8011dd00" mode="X" associatedObjectId="72057594038910976">
    <owner-list>
     <owner id="process5dd4c8" mode="X"/>
    </owner-list>
    <waiter-list>
     <waiter id="process4c3708" mode="S" requestType="wait"/>
    </waiter-list>
   </keylock>
   <keylock hobtid="72057594038910976" dbid="5" objectname="ccp.dbo.TradeInfo" indexname="PK__Activity__3214EC07060DEAE8" id="lock8a864e00" mode="X" associatedObjectId="72057594038910976">
    <owner-list>
     <owner id="process4c3708" mode="X"/>
    </owner-list>
    <waiter-list>
     <waiter id="process5dd4c8" mode="S" requestType="wait"/>
    </waiter-list>
   </keylock>
  </resource-list>
 </deadlock>
</deadlock-list>
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1  
Beside the indexes, to avoid deadlocks it's very important to make sure that your code access tables in the same order. –  niktrs Oct 3 '12 at 11:08
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It wouldn't (without locking hints)

Presumably there was a preceding statement in the same transaction (not shown in the deadlock graph) that actually acquired the X lock.

Notice that logused="1580" which also wouldn't happen if the statement was a standalone SELECT

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Interesting.. I thought this must be the case. What's the best way to work out the statements that caused the X lock? –  CraftyFella Oct 3 '12 at 12:19
1  
@CraftyFella - Can you not look at the calling code to see what other statements the one shown shares a transaction with? Otherwise maybe have Profiler running during a load test and have a look back at previous statements for the same SPID preceding the deadlock. –  Martin Smith Oct 3 '12 at 12:23
    
Thanks. I think I have enough to get going.. so i think what's happening is 2 Xclusive locks are happening, but adding the index means that the select isn't waiting for the Xclusive lock in the other process. Thus it can continue and isn't dead locked. –  CraftyFella Oct 3 '12 at 12:27
1  
Also you might be able to use extended events filtered to fire on the acquisition of the X lock on the object of interest that captures the statement text (just an idea I haven't looked into that in detail) –  Martin Smith Oct 3 '12 at 12:29
    
What do you think about my theory on why the indexing solves it? –  CraftyFella Oct 3 '12 at 12:41
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None of the SELECT's in the deadlock XML actually acquires an X lock. The two resources involved in the deadlock are currently owned in X mode and requested in S mode. Which implies that each transaction has previously locked the resource (in this case, a key), perhaps it had run an DML statement that updated/inserted that row. The SELECT statements only want to read the row, so they request S mode.

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Interesting.. I thought this must be the case. What's the best way to work out the statements that caused the X lock? –  CraftyFella Oct 3 '12 at 12:17
1  
What's the best way to work out the statements that caused the X lock: Source code inspection. –  Remus Rusanu Oct 3 '12 at 12:24
    
Was wondering if there was a way you could do it in Profiler.. turning on some setting.. "show all statements for a process in deadlock graph" oh well –  CraftyFella Oct 3 '12 at 12:28
1  
The statement may had been executed one hour ago (unlikely). The point is that is something in the past, it would be unrealistic to keep a history of execution in case a deadlock occurs. You can certainly use Profiler to see what's being executed, see SP:StmtCompleted and SQL:StmtCompleted –  Remus Rusanu Oct 3 '12 at 12:36
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