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I have written code to reverse a string in c... it works fine but I can't return the reversed string in the main() function.

#include<stdio.h>

main()
{
  char a[17]="abcdefg";
  reverse(a);
  printf("\n");
  system("PAUSE");
}
int reverse(char *a)
{
   if(*a!='\0')
   {   
     reverse(a+1);
   }
   printf("%c",*a);
}         

it prints the reversed string but I want the reversed string in main(). How can I do this?

share|improve this question
    
Is this a homework assignment? –  happyhairydude Oct 3 '12 at 11:15
    
nopes i am studying recursion –  Amol Singh Oct 3 '12 at 11:18
    
The int reverse() function should at least return an int. –  wildplasser Oct 3 '12 at 11:20
1  
You have to swap characters in the string (an in-place reverse) rather than printing them. A recursive solution is inefficient but can be done fairly easily. –  Brian White Oct 3 '12 at 16:01

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to modify the string, i.e. the input buffer to reverse(), instead of just printing it.

Doing this recursively seems a bit obnoxious, but should of course be possible.

Basically, I guess the printing becomes an assignment, something like this:

  1. Base: The reversal of an empty string is the empty string.
  2. Step: The reversal of a string begins by swapping the first and last characters, then recursing over the remainder of the string.
share|improve this answer
    
i didnt get you –  Amol Singh Oct 3 '12 at 11:15
    
it seems a bit complicated ... –  Amol Singh Oct 3 '12 at 11:20

Following is one way to reverse string using recursion!

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

void rev_str_recursive(char arr[], size_t iStart, size_t iLast)
{
    if( iStart < iLast )
    {
        //swap
        char temp = arr[iStart];
        arr[iStart] = arr[iLast];
        arr[iLast] = temp;

        rev_str_recursive(arr, ++iStart, --iLast);  
    }
}

void main()
{
    char cArray[] = {"A quick brown fox jumps over a lazy dog"};

    rev_str_recursive(cArray, 0, strlen(cArray)-1);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Because of the -1 in the original invocation of the function, this fails horribly when the string is empty (so strlen(cArray) is 0, so the value passed as iLast is the maximum value of size_t). You can simplify the interface by calling it as rev_str_recursive(cArray, strlen(cArray)) and arranging the recursive call as rev_str_recursive(arr+1, iLast-2); only when iLast > 2. Of course, since it is tail recursive, the code can be optimized to a loop without recursion. –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 14 '13 at 17:01
    
Thanks for the feedback, I concur with you, if the string is empty this will fail! –  AFI Jul 1 '14 at 18:43

This code is not executable :( You define int reverse but reverse function doesnt return any value

instead use this (using void):

#include<stdio.h>

main()
{
  char a[17]="abcdefg";
  reverse(a);
  printf("\n");
  system("PAUSE");
}
void reverse(char *a)
{
   if(*a!='\0')
   {   
     reverse(a+1);
   }
   printf("%c",*a);
}        
share|improve this answer
    
How does this change the value of a? –  Bill Lynch Feb 4 at 15:54

use sprintf it will print your reversed string into buffer.

#include<stdio.h>

char *b;

main()
{
  char a[17]="abcdefg";
  char buffer[17];
  buffer[0]= '\0';
  b = buffer;
  reverse(a);
  printf("%s\n",buffer);
}
int reverse(char *a)
{
   if(*a!='\0')
   {   
     reverse(a+1);
     sprintf(b,"%c",*a);
     b++;
   }

}
share|improve this answer
    
There is a semicolon missing after char buffer[17]. Also: buffer is not an lvalue, so buffer++; is not possible. –  wildplasser Oct 3 '12 at 11:39
    
code updated. I tested it and it works. –  MOHAMED Oct 3 '12 at 12:07
    
We really don't need to use a global variable for something like this... –  Bill Lynch Feb 4 at 15:53
#include<stdio.h>
void reverse(char *a);
main()
{
  char a[17]="abcdefg";
  reverse(a);
  printf("\n");
  system("PAUSE");
}
void reverse(char *a)
{
   if(*a!='\0')
   {   
     reverse(a+1);
   }
   printf("%c",*a);
}  
share|improve this answer
2  
Did you do anything but copy the code from the question? –  Bill Lynch Feb 4 at 15:52
    
He added the forward declaration of reverse(char* a) didn't he? –  Edd Feb 4 at 16:39
1  
@Edd: Two thoughts: 1. The question was about reversing the string in such a way that it could be accessed from the calling function. 2. When you post an answer that is only code, a big far warning comes up saying "maybe you should explain what this code block is doing". –  Bill Lynch Feb 4 at 16:42
1  
@BillLynch I'm not disagreeing with any of that (and I voted/edited accordingly) I was just trying to answer you question as to whether anything had changed. –  Edd Feb 4 at 16:45

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