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According to Stroustrup : The C++ programming language :-

"When a vector is resized to accommodate more (or fewer) elements, all of its elements may be moved to new locations."

Is this holds true, even if the vector is re-sized to smaller size ?

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The accepted answer is wrong, providing a quote from the standard does not make an answer right if the quote is from the wrong part of the standard :) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 3 '12 at 13:12
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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Case 1: If the new size being requested is greater than the current std::vector::capacity() then all elements will be relocated.
Case 2: If the new size being requested is lesser than the current std::vector::capacity() then there will be no relocation of elements.


Standerdese Evidence:

The standard defines effect of vector::resize() as:

C++11 Standard 23.3.6.3/12 vector capacity:

void resize(size_type sz, const T& c);

Effect:

if (sz > size())
     insert(end(), sz-size(), c);
else if (sz < size())
    erase(begin()+sz, end());
else
; // do nothing

As @DavidRodríguez-dribeas correctly points out, Iterator invalidation rules for std::vector::insert() operation are:

23.3.6.5 vector modifiers

1 [insert,push_back,emplace,emplace_back]

Remarks: Causes reallocation if the new size is greater than the old capacity. If no reallocation happens, all the iterators and references before the insertion point remain valid.

Essentially this means: All iterators and references before the point of insertion will be unaffected, unless the new container size is greater than the previous capacity because in such a scenario all elements might be moved to new locations thus invalidating pointers/iterators to original location.Since resize() only erases/inserts elements at the end of the container[Note 1].The governing factor boils down to size being requested as against current capacity.

Hence the Case 1 result.

In Case 2 std::vector::erase() will be called and the invalidation rule in this case is:

23.3.6.5 vector modifiers

iterator erase(const_iterator position);

3 Effects: Invalidates iterators and references at or after the point of the erase.

Since [Note 1], elements will be only removed at end and there is no need of relocation of all elements.

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@DavidRodríguez-dribeas - I don't know what a "regular insert" is, but the rule is that if reallocation is needed, all iterators and references are invalidated. So, unless you have explicit knowledge of the state of the vector, you can't assume that any iterator or reference remains valid. Granted, it's possible to write code that can determine whether an insert will invalidate everything, but most situations don't call for that level of detail. –  Pete Becker Oct 3 '12 at 13:32
    
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas: I agree with your objection.I somehow missed considering and mentioning how capacity() & size() affect the scenario.You can add the relevant resize() quote from the standard to your answer. i will delete this answer once OP removes the acceptance(I cannot delete since untill it stays accepted) –  Alok Save Oct 3 '12 at 14:38
    
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas: Done. Thanks! –  Alok Save Oct 3 '12 at 15:25
    
Removed comments as they no longer apply. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 3 '12 at 15:46
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...elements may be moved to new locations."

Notice how it says may be moved. So that would imply that it depends what what kind of a resize it is.

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Iterators in a vector are invalidated for two reasons. An element is inserted/removed before the location of the iterator (1) or the whole buffer is relocated (2) if the vector needs to grow it's capacity. The key here is a change to the capacity().

Because resize() only inserts/removes from the end of the container. When the vector shrinks only those iterators referring to the elements being removed become invalidated. When the vector grows no iterator will become invalid if the new size is smaller than capacity(), and all iterators will be invalidated if the new size is larger.

Since Als provided incorrect evidence1, I am adding here the correct quotes:

23.3.6.5 vector modifiers

1 [insert,push_back,emplace,emplace_back]

Remarks: Causes reallocation if the new size is greater than the old capacity. If no reallocation happens, all the iterators and references before the insertion point remain valid.

2 [erase]

Effects: Invalidates iterators and references at or after the point of the erase.

Similar quotes can be found in C++03.


1 Avoiding to duplicate the quote that dictates the equivalence of resize to either insert or erase. Which is right.

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+1 for pointing out the incorrectness. –  Alok Save Oct 3 '12 at 15:28
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The answer in the body of the question ""When a vector is resized to accommodate more (or fewer) elements, all of its elements may be moved to new locations.""

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