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I have come across the singleton pattern. I was unable to understand the difference between

singletonobj.getinstance().dosomething() //1st one

and

singletonobj.dosomething() //2nd one

What does getinstance() do, that isn’t being done in the second case?

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@m0skit0: Sure... –  Rasmi Ranjan Nayak Oct 4 '12 at 11:24
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

First, singletonobj is a wrong/confusing name. Singletons are called on a class basis, like:

Log::getInstance().doSomething();

and not

Log log = new Log;
log.getInstance().doSomething();

So this should answer the question, but I'll detail anyway :)

Log::doSomething();

would force doSomething() to be a static method, while

Log::getInstance().doSomething();

has doSomething() as an instance method.

Why use getInstance()? Because a singleton, by its very definition, should only have zero or one instances. By making the constructor for a singleton private and publishing the getInstance() method, it allows you to control how many instances of this class there are. The private constructor is simply to avoid other classes to instance this class, which would defeat the purpose of this class being a singleton, as you wouldn't be able to control how many instances of this class there are.

class SingletonExample {

    private:
    static SingletonExample* instance = NULL;

    SingletonExample() { }

    public:

    static SingletonExample getInstance() {

        if (instance == NULL) {
            instance = new SingletonExample;
        }

        return *instance;
    }

    void doSomething() {            
        // Do something :)
    }


}
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You missed the c++ tag –  R. Martinho Fernandes Oct 3 '12 at 11:41
    
You know the question is about C++, right? –  Luchian Grigore Oct 3 '12 at 11:41
    
Yeah, did not see. Anyway, only syntax and details change. Concept is the same. –  m0skit0 Oct 3 '12 at 11:43
    
@m0skit0: Still I have one more question, could you pls elaborate why do we need private constructor?, where as the body of private constructor is empty. –  Rasmi Ranjan Nayak Oct 3 '12 at 12:23
    
Private constructor is simply to avoid other classes to instance this class, which would defeat the purpose of this class being a singleton, as you wouldn't be able to control how many instances of this class there are. –  m0skit0 Oct 3 '12 at 12:25
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Well, technically, singletonobj.getinstance() is redundant, because that means you already got a hold of the object.

The call would usually look something like:

SingletonClass::getinstance().dosomething();

or

singletonobj.dosomething()

in case you pre-fetched the object - i.e. previously did

SingletonClass& singletonobj = SingletonClass::getinstance();
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It would appear that that the first example is calling a regular method, whereas the second example is calling a static method.

The Singleton design pattern ensures that only a single instance of a given object is instantiated at any given time. The first example returns said instance, and then calls a method using an instance of an object.

The second example appears to be using a static method that does not require an instance of an object and actually invalidates the singleton design pattern...

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I don't see how that invalidates anything. –  Luchian Grigore Oct 3 '12 at 11:34
    
@Joschc1107 - I expect singletonobj to be the single instance. So singletonobj.getinstance () probably returns singletonobj again. Which, while redundant (and showing a rather big gap in the author's understanding of the pattern), doesn't really go against the pattern. –  ArjunShankar Oct 3 '12 at 11:37
    
My question would by why put static methods into a singleton class that don't require an instance of the object? Perhaps invalidate is too strong of a word, as the pattern can be implemented in other methods. However, I'm curious as to why one would want both in the same object. Besides harming testability, would this not cause a heterogeneous mix of object functionality? It is my understanding that the point of a singleton is to provide methods that require as shared pool of resources instantiated once. If a method does not require these, does it really belong in that object? –  JoshC13 Oct 3 '12 at 11:44
    
@ArjunShankar - got it. Not sure if the question was edited or I missed it the first time, but I see where they're getting the instance from the object. I thought they were calling these methods from the class definition. All makes sense now... –  JoshC13 Oct 3 '12 at 11:46
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