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Sometimes, in my app, I would like to create a copy of a file that already exist, but I don't want to test if the file already exist, I want only that a copy of that file be created, like Windows 7 do.

E.g.: A file tips.txt. When my app copy it, another file will be created named tips - copy.txt. After, if necessary, a "copy of a copy" tips - copy - copy.txt.

Is there something that I can do in this situation?

Obs: in this app, I am using .NET 3.5 and WPF.

Obs2: I made this question because I thought already existed something similar in .NET.

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Why don't you want to test if the file is already there, Windows does before giving you the prompt in question, so why wouldn't you do what Windows does? –  Ramhound Oct 3 '12 at 12:34
    
Try ctrl-c ctrl-v on a file. I would like to create the same functionality (because I thought already existed something similar in .NET) –  Felipe Volpatto Oct 3 '12 at 12:38

8 Answers 8

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You should extract the filename and the extension then do a simple File.Copy with a new formatted name

   string fileName = "tips.txt"; 
   string file = Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(fileName);
   string ext = Path.GetExtension(fileName);
   File.Copy(fileName, string.Format("{0} - Copy{1}", file, ext); 

things get a bit more complicated if you have a fullpath to copy from

   string fileName = "C:\\test\\tips.txt"; 
   string path = Path.GetDirectoryName(fileName);
   string file = Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(fileName);
   string ext = Path.GetExtension(fileName);
   File.Copy(fileName, Path.Combine(path, string.Format("{0} - Copy{1}", file, ext)); 

but if you really want to mimic the behavior of Windows Explorer we should do:

string fileName = "C:\\test\\tips.txt"; 
string path = Path.GetDirectoryName(fileName);
string file = Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(fileName);
string ext = Path.GetExtension(fileName);
if(file.EndsWith(" - Copy")) file = file.Remove(0, file.Length - 7);
string destFile = Path.Combine(path, string.Format("{0} - Copy{1}", file, ext)); 
int num = 2;
while(File.Exists(destFile))
{
    destFile = Path.Combine(path, string.Format("{0} - Copy ({1}){2}", file, num, ext)); 
    num++;
}
File.Copy(fileName, destFile); 

If Windows Explorer copies a file that ends with " - Copy", it adds a progressive number to destination file, not another " - Copy".
You should also consider that the string 'Copy' is localized and thus it changes in non-english version of the operating system.

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OK now I have tested the whole stuff and it seems to be correct –  Steve Oct 3 '12 at 13:21
    
+1 I believe your third block of code is exactly what the OP is looking for. But check your use of capitalization (copy vs Copy). –  Michael Mankus Oct 3 '12 at 13:27
    
Yes, this is the best solution for my situation. Thanks a lot, @Steve. –  Felipe Volpatto Oct 3 '12 at 13:30
    
@michael.mankus good spot thanks corrected –  Steve Oct 3 '12 at 16:41

In addition to other answers suggesting the usage of classes in the System.IO namespace if you want to get the exact same semantics as Windows Copy dialog, you could use the IFileOperation COM object. And here's a managed wrapper for it.

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Not sure if this is exactly what you mean, but:

string fileName = "tips.txt";
File.Copy(fileName, string.format("{0} - copy", fileName);

Or:

File.Copy(fileName, string.format("{0} - copy{1}", 
    Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(fileName),
    Path.GetExtension(fileName));
share|improve this answer
    
Yes. But, aren't there something in the framework that do this automatically? I'm not sure, but ROBOCOPY on DOS doesn't do something file this? –  Felipe Volpatto Oct 3 '12 at 12:31
    
@Steve - see latest edit –  pm_2 Oct 3 '12 at 12:36
    
@FelipeVolpatto - What exactly do you mean by "automatically"? –  pm_2 Oct 3 '12 at 12:50
    
@pm_2 Something like when you use ctrl-c ctrl-v on a file. –  Felipe Volpatto Oct 3 '12 at 12:52

You can use File.Copy http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/9706cfs5.aspx

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It will generate an exception saying that file already exist. –  Felipe Volpatto Oct 3 '12 at 12:28
    
@FelipeVolpatto - So catch the exception and handle it. If you don't want to check if the file already exists then that is the only solution. –  Ramhound Oct 3 '12 at 12:36
1  
@Ramhound No, it doesn't create the file. –  Felipe Volpatto Oct 3 '12 at 12:47

What about :

    public static void CopyFileLikeWin7(string pathIn,string fileName, string pathOut)
    {
        string potentialFileName = Path.Combine(pathOut,fileName);
        if(File.Exists(potentialFileName))
        {
            CopyFileLikeWin7(pathIn, Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(fileName) + "-copy" + Path.GetExtension(fileName), pathOut);
        }
        else
        {
            File.Copy(pathIn,potentialFileName);
        }
    }
share|improve this answer

How about

string fileName = "tips.txt";
string filenamewithoutext = Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(fileName);
string ext = Path.GetExtension(fileName);
File.Copy(fileName, string.format("{0} - Copy{1}", filenamewithoutext, ext);
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Ok, do not test. Just copy the file and don't handle exception

try
{
File.Copy("",""); 
} 
finally 
{
}
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Something like this? I think there is plenty of more simple ways in doing this.

string destination = "";
var fileInfo = new FileInfo(@"c:\temp\tips.txt");
var ext = fileInfo.Extension;
var filename = fileInfo.Name.Remove(fileInfo.Name.Length - 4);
File.Copy(fileInfo.FullName, destination + filename + " - Copy" + ext);
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