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That, obviously, works:

def test_A():
    magic = str(uuid.uuid4())

    def handler(request):
        return magic

    assert handler(0) == magic

While this fails with 'Local variable referenced before assignment':

def test_A():
    magic = str(uuid.uuid4())

    def handler(request):
        magic = magic
        return magic

    assert handler(0) == magic

In second snippet, i assume that magic becomes a local variable, operated independently from the one in the upper scope.

I know that to modify global variable I have to declare it as global, but what i do want to do here is to create independent local variable with coincidentally same name. Is this not possible at all and I have to select a different name for local variable?

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3 Answers 3

handler() can reach back one level on the stack and get its caller's local variable with the same name.

def test_A():
    magic = str(uuid.uuid4())

    def handler(request):
        magic = sys._getframe(1).f_locals['magic']
        return magic

    assert handler(0) == magic
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If test_A.magic remains constant, you could use its value to define a keyword argument with default value:

def test_A():
    magic = str(uuid.uuid4())

    def handler(request, magic = magic):
        # magic here will be a local variable, whose
        # default value will be set to the value of test_A.magic 
        # at the time the def handler statement was parsed.
        return magic

    assert handler(0) == magic    
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In general, it is a very bad practice to call a global and local variable by the same name. If these would be inside classes you could specify the scope more easily.

However, you can access the global variable by using the globals() function, which returns a dictionary with the globals, so you get:

magic=globals()['magic']
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1  
magic is a variable from the enclosing scope and not necessarily global. –  Maksim Skurydzin Oct 3 '12 at 13:01
    
@MaximSkurydin then you should put them inside a class. –  Bitwise Oct 3 '12 at 13:07
    
@MaximSkurydin the question is exactly about that - how can I locally override non-global variables from enclosing scopes –  pupssman Oct 3 '12 at 14:04

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