Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In an implementation, i have written the following code. The try-catch block is in a method

try{
    InputVals iv = task.getInputVals();
    Map<String, String> map = iv.getAllValues();
    String a = map.get("value1");
    String b = map.get("value2");
    String x = funcxy.methodGetX();
    String y = funcxy.methodGetY();
    iv.setValue(xval, x);
    iv.setValue(yval,y);

    String []names = {"name1", "name2", "name3"}
    for(int i = 0; i<names.length; i++ ){
         iv.setValue("name"+i, names[i] );
    }
  }

When I make concurrent request few times (not always) it throws "java.util.ConcurrentModificationException: concurrent access to hashmap" error. I tried using

Map<String, String> map= new ConcurrentHashMap<String, String>();
map = iv.getAllValues();

But this didnt solve the issue. Can you help me out and let me know where I'm making the mistake. I cannot change the implementation of

InputVals iv = task.getInputVals();
share|improve this question
    
Is that code inside a for loop?? You might consider posting some more code.. –  Rohit Jain Oct 3 '12 at 12:59
    
My apologies. I have updated the query with more code. –  Shruthi Oct 3 '12 at 13:09
    
First of all, show the actual stacktrace. Second, you said that you are making concurrent requests, do you mean that the code shown is in a method being called concurrently on multiple threads? –  Robin Oct 3 '12 at 13:28
    
yeah, the code shown is in a method –  Shruthi Oct 3 '12 at 13:38
    
You need to show more code, as it isn't possible to get the exception you are getting in the little bit of code you are showing. You are not showing where the map is actually modified. There are only two gets. –  Robin Oct 3 '12 at 13:39

4 Answers 4

What does your InputVals.setValue() does? How is it defined? there is no use if you define ConcurrentHashMap in the business logic as you are using the reference of original variable. You would need to take care in the actual bean itself.

If it some thing like below

Class Inputvals {
  Map<String, String> map = new HashMap <String,String>();
  public void setValue(String a,String b){
    map.put(a,b);
  }
  public Map<String,String> getAllValues(){
    return map;
  }
}

I suggest you to change as below

Class Inputvals {
  Map<String, String> map = new ConcurrentHashMap<String,String>();
  public void setValue(String a,String b){
    map.put(a,b);
  }
  ..
  ...

this should help you to resolve multi threaded access issue.

share|improve this answer

I'm not entirely sure what you are trying to achieve, but as others have already pointed out, you likely have multiple threads trying to manipulate the map returned by iv.getAllValues() at the same time, hence throwing the exception.

Copying the map with a ConcurrentHashMap will work as you would be working off a local copy. However keep in mind that in doing so, you would be using it locally only, and consequently not need the concurrency checking that it provides. The problem with your code is that you do not actually copy the data to your new map. You would have needed to do:

Map<String, String> map= new ConcurrentHashMap<String, String>( iv.getAllValues() );

Depending on your needs when making the modifications to the map entries, the simplest & fastest would probably copy the map and work off a local copy. This will prevent any concurrency issues. Of course, if the other threads need access to your updated information, this plan does not work.

try{
    InputVals iv = task.getInputVals();
    Map<String, String> map = new HashMap<String, String>();
    // copy all map values to a local var
    map.putAll( iv.getAllValues() );
    String a = map.get("value1");
    String b = map.get("value2");
    String x = funcxy.methodGetX();
    String y = funcxy.methodGetY();
    iv.setValue(xval, x);
    iv.setValue(yval,y);

    String []names = {"name1", "name2", "name3"}
    for(int i = 0; i<names.length; i++ ){
         iv.setValue("name"+i, names[i] );
    }
  }

Short of this, you would need to ensure that any calls to the map are made in synchronized blocks. However, this can be extremely difficult and tedious if you have several different places in the code where you access this map.

share|improve this answer
1  
ConcurrentHashMap is not a wrapper. It's an actual concurrent hashmap implementation. –  Marko Topolnik Oct 3 '12 at 18:48
    
@MarkoTopolnik Agreed - my mistake; I was thinking of Collections.synchronizedMap(). I have edited my response to reflect that. –  Eric B. Oct 3 '12 at 18:55
1  
This is my take: InputVals is a class under OP's control. He should go into its implementation and change the map implementation used to hold the inputVals to ConcurrentHashMap. Maybe you could advise that (if you agree). –  Marko Topolnik Oct 3 '12 at 18:59
    
@MarkoTopolnik Absolutely, however two things to keep in mind. 1) The OP indicated that he cannot change the implementation of InputVals iv = task.getInputVals(); 2) Just changing it to a ConcurrentHashMap will not necessarily resolve all the problems. There can still be unexpected side-effects. All the ConcurrentHashMap provides is a guarantee that no threads will simultaneously change the value of the map. However it provides no guarantees that two threads will not have race conditions where one thread's value overrides another. –  Eric B. Oct 3 '12 at 19:04
    
I managed to miss that last sentence in the question, yes. But, as for race conditions, it is impossible to know whether that would be an actual problem. Just for the record, the CHM does in fact allow two threads to simultaneously change the map (it is a true concurrent map implementation, not just a thread-safe one). –  Marko Topolnik Oct 3 '12 at 19:21

You have to synchronize all access to the Map returned by the getInputVals(). It is being altered somewhere in a separate thread. You will need something along the lines of the code below, but what is also very important is that the lockObj must also be applied everywhere else that this map is being used, including wherever it is currently being modified (this code has not been shown).

try{
    InputVals iv = task.getInputVals();
    String a;
    String b;

    synchronized (lockOjb) {
        Map<String, String> map = iv.getAllValues();
        a = map.get("value1");
        b = map.get("value2");
    }
    String x = funcxy.methodGetX();
    String y = funcxy.methodGetY();
    iv.setValue(xval, x);
    iv.setValue(yval,y);

    String []names = {"name1", "name2", "name3"}
    for(int i = 0; i<names.length; i++ ){
         iv.setValue("name"+i, names[i] );
    }
  }

This may or may not be possible, depending on whether you have the ability to change this code. If it is already happening within a library, for instance, you may simply have to redesign your code so that it is not multithreaded, at least anywhere where this map is accessed.

share|improve this answer

You may need to wrap your map in a Synchronized collection

Map<String, String> map = Collections.synchronizedMap(iv.getAllValues());

Then go ahead and access your map.

share|improve this answer
1  
This would simply make each thread wrap the map, thus they would not be blocking each others access to the underlying map. It would still be accessed concurrently. –  Robin Oct 3 '12 at 14:59

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.